Residents Who Served A-L

 Residents Who Served M - Z

The District of Saanich remembers the following residents who served in the First World War:

Ahiers, Stanley Walker

Killed in Action.

Alexander, Thomas (Private)

Killed in Action 27 September 1918. Service Number: 826082. 143rd Battalion Serial Number: 771902. Thomas Alexander was born in Victoria on March 19, 1894 to Irish born parents Thomas Alexander and Rachel (Jamieson) of 725 Admirals Rd. His mother Rachel died on July 4, 1898. Thomas, a farmer, enlisted in the Canadian Infantry on February 19, 1916. He was wounded and gassed at Passchendaele in October 1917, and then hospitalized in England for removal of shrapnel (left cheek and jaw) and to recover from gassing. In May 1918, he was deemed fit to return to duty. Thomas was killed in action in France on September 27, 1918. He is buried in Quarry Wood Cemetery, Sains-les-Marquion, France (Ref. III C. 24) and is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Allberry, Harry (Private)

Service Number: 77841. Henry Pratt Allberry was born in Kensington, London, England June 21st, 1885. He came to Canada in 1904 (1911 census Ward 6 Page 3) and worked as a farmer. Harry enlisted November 23rd, 1914 in the 50th Gordon Highlanders, CEF. He was later transferred to the 30th Battalion C.E.F., and then to the 15th Battalion C.E.F. September of 1915 - his records show him promoted to Lance Corporal and then in November, to Sergeant. On discharge his rank is listed as Staff Sergeant. While with the 15th Battalion, he was transferred to France in May of 1915. He seems to have escaped the war without any injuries, other than a 5 day hospitalization for a loose cartilage in his right knee. Harry was discharge May 14th 1919 to St. Marks Vicarage, 3440 Whittier Ave., Victoria, B.C. (LAC—Soldiers of the First World War). On July 8th, 1919, Henry Pratt Allberry married Winnifred May Flinton at St. Mark`s Church, Victoria. (B.C. Archives). From there they moved to the Comox Valley where he was involved in farming. He served as a Provincial Elections officer in the Grantham RR1, Sandwick district, June 7th, 1934. Henry Pratt Allberry died May 6th, 1964 at St. Joseph`s Hospital, Comox B.C. (B.C. Archives). He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Almond, William Thomas (Private)

Service Number: 401999;431109. Private William Thomas Almond was born in Darwen, Lancashire, England August 11th, 1892. His time of immigration to Canada is unknown. He joined the 88th Victoria Fusiliers, a local militia unit established in Victoria in 1912. On June 4th, 1915, William signed his attestment papers at Willows Camp and was placed in the 48th Battalion CEF, regimental numbers 401999-431109. He lists his father William Almond as next of kin with the address of Merchant St., Keating, Vancouver Island. While in England, William married Ruth --, on November 20, 1915. Her address was listed as Darwen Lancashire. Being married to a Canadian soldier in France, she was entitled to a separation allowance of $20.00 per month. William embarked for France on March 9th, 1916, and promptly sprained his ankle on the 18th. By April 1st, he was back on active duty. He was transferred to the 29th Battalion CEF on May 27th 1917, with which he remained for the duration of the war. In October of 1918 he was granted leave which he decided to extend somewhat. On his return, he was sentenced to 7 days CB (confined to barracks?), and docked 7 days’ pay for overstaying leave. He was awarded the British War Medal, and Victory Medal. On demobilization he settled in Saskatoon Saskatchewan with his wife Ruth. Their address is listed as 919 Avenue G North Saskatoon. (LAC—records, Soldiers of the First World War). William died in Memorial Pavilion on June 6th, 1989. At the time of his death, his listed occupation is milkman and place of work simply dairy. His marital status is widowed with his wife’s name being listed as Margate nee. Corless. (B.C. Archives). William Thomas Almond is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Amos, Thomas (Private)

Service Number: 431156. Thomas Amos was born August 20th, 1885 in Staffordshire England to parents David Amos and Rebecca Lees. He emigrated to Canada in 1908, with his brother Ernest and sister Beatrice. They resided in the Royal Oak area of Saanich in the 1911 census. Thomas enlisted on June 19th, 1915 and was attached to the 48th Battalion CEF. He gave his occupation then as rancher, although on his immigration papers and military medical form he listed himself as a painter. At the time of his enlistment Thomas was married to Agnes Gertrude (nee Payne). They married at Christ Church Cathedral on December 14th, 1914. Thomas arrived in England July 10th of 1915 with the 48th Battalion. He then appears to have been moved three times till he was sent to the 4th DSG. On August 10th 1916, Thomas moved with the 4th DSG to France for the duration of the war. Excerpts from his medical records show that he was treated for an ulcer on his left heel which resulted from wearing a new pair of boots for several days, blistering, and the blister becoming infected resulting in hospitalization. On April 5, 1916 Thomas was promoted to corporal, but by May 2nd, 2016, he reverted back to the rank of private at his own request. Back on the home front, wife Agnes was collecting twenty dollars a month Separation Allowance. According to the records, she moved twice during that time, to 1764 North Hampshire Rd. in Oak Bay, and then to 1032 Redfern Street. Thomas was awarded a Good Conduct badge on June 21st, 1917. Then January 21st, 1918 saw him up on charges, “sentenced to forfeit 28 days’ pay for 1) drunkenness, 2) being absent from billet without leave after 9 pm”. Thomas was demobilized June 21, 1919 with his home destination listed as being Royal Oak, Vancouver Island. Thomas died February 12th, 1959 in Sidney B.C. At that time he had resided on Orchard Avenue in Sidney for about 3 years. Occupation at the time of his death is listed as Commissionaire. Thomas Amos is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by V. Minaker. Sources: Library & Archives Canada records; BC Archives genealogy records; FamilySearch.org | Attestation Papers

Anderson, R.

Research in progress.

Anderson William Robertson (Private)

Service Number: 478879. William Robertson Anderson was born in Victoria, B.C. on May 9th, 1896 to parents William and Margaret Watson Anderson. The Andersons resided in the Maywood PO. district of Saanich. He enlisted in the Royal Canadian Regiment on October 6th, 1914, and while stationed at Work Point Barracks, he transferred to the PPCL Infantry on January 31st 1916, reg. number 478879. At the time of enlistment William lists his occupation as plumber. He arrived in England on April 10, 1916, and in France on August 25, 1916. In November of 1916, he was reported sick, and was transferred to medical care in England. There William was diagnosed with chronic nephritis (Bright’s disease). By July of 1917, it was recommended that William be discharged as unfit for further service. He returned to Canada upon the hospital ship Araquoyon in September of 1917. On arrival in Esquimalt William was officially discharged on January 22nd, 1918. A follow up on May 7th, 1920 showed his address as 3477 Douglas Street. He lists a profession of Steam Fitter, employed by R.J. Nott & Co, Victoria, B.C. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Angus Jack Ironside (Sergeant)

Service Number: 180409. John Ironside Angus was born in Motherwell, Scotland on May 20th, 1891 to parents Alexander Angus and Mary Innes. The family immigrated to Canada in 1904, settling in the Royal Oak area of Saanich. (Ward 4 P. 23, 1911 census). Jack enlisted in the CEF, 88th Battalion on November 6th, 1915. His occupation is listed as B.C. Land Surveyor Assistant. He was promoted to Lance Corporal on November 16th, 1915; to Corporal in December 1915; and to Sergeant in April of 1916. In March of 1916, Jack was qualified as an “Assistant Instructor of Physical Training and Bayonet Fighting”. Upon completing his training in Canada, Sgt. Angus embarked for England. There, according to his military records, his rank was reduced to Private at his request. Private Angus landed in France on August 12th, 1916 with the 29th Battalion, seeing 8 months of fighting in the “European War, Flanders”. On December 11th, 1916 Angus was promoted to rank of Corporal. On February 8th, 1917, Jack appears to be up on charges as his record shows him “Placed under stoppage to cover costs of repair to Government Property, namely Cdn Great Coat, value $4/-.“ Corporal Jack Angus was wounded by allied machine gun fire at Vimy Ridge on April 9th, 1917. He received a bullet wound through his lower jaw, fracturing it and causing the loss of his 4 bottom teeth. He was treated initially at an Australian field hospital before transportation back to England. At this time he was also listed as suffering from Shell Shock. Unfortunately for Jack his jaw fracture did not heal well. On June 28th, 1917 he was transferred to specialized care “Jaw Section” in Birmingham. July 15th saw “eight pieces of bone removed from exit wound”. In September it was reported that the fracture was not healing still and October 23rd, 1917 saw him Invalided to Canada, on board the hospital ship Araguaya. Jack arrived back in Victoria on January 19th, 1918, eventually being moved to Resthaven Hospital for treatment until his discharge. Corporal John I. Angus was discharged from the Army on April 30th, 1918 as unfit for further service. His wound must have healed eventually for on his records a well healed scar on his chin is noted. John Ironside Angus married Margaret Duncan McDonald January 28th, 1928 in Esquimalt, B.C. He worked as a Customs Officer with the Federal Government until retirement. On October 7th, 1962, Jack died in the Veterans Hospital in Victoria. (Vital Statistic Records, Provincial Archives). He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker. Attestation Papers  

Apps, William John (Corporal)

Killed in Action 8 August 1916. Service Number: 9. William John Apps was born in Portsmouth England on July 9th, 1887. His attestation papers were signed in Ottawa, Ontario on January 20th, 1915. He was assigned to the Second Division, Canadian Engineers, reg. #9. William lists his profession as painter. On those papers his next of kin is listed as a Miss J. M. Morris of 855 Queens Avenue, Victoria B.C., and in his will, all is to go Miss Morris, friend, in the event of his death. It is also noted that he has a brother Sapper Herbert Thomas Apps located in Malta. On September 9th, 1915 Private Apps disembarked in Havre, France. William was promoted to Lance Corporal on March 25th, 1916. William John Apps was killed in action on August 8th, 1916. He is buried at Ridgewood Military Cemetery and is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker. In September 2015, a group visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including Ridgewood Military Cemetery. Photographs courtesy of Gavin Cooper.  Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves | Ridgewood Military Cemetery 1| Ridgewood Military Cemetery 2| Grave

Armstrong, Noble Wicketts (Private)

Service Number: 2293736. Noble Wicketts Armstrong was born in Sharbot, Ontario on April 6th, 1898 to parents Richard S. Armstrong and Hannah M. Lewis. On February 13th, 1918, Noble enlisted in the CEF, Lord Strathcona Horses (RC) reg. #2293736 at Winnipeg Manitoba. At this time he stated his address as: Royal North West Mounted Police Barracks, Prince Albert Saskatchewan, where he had been billeted the last year. Prior to that he listed his occupation as farmer. While still in Canada, Private Armstrong was hospitalized for eleven days with diphtheria. Once recovered he was shipped overseas to England, arriving on April 11th, 1918. From June 16th to August 2nd, 1918 he was hospitalized at the West Cliff Canadian Eye and Ear Hospital in Folkestone for tonsillitis. After treatment with Sulfa, he underwent a tonsillectomy and was declared fit to return to duty. Nobel arrived in France on Nov 1, 1918 and was transferred to the Canadian Light Horses. He departed England to return to Canada on board the SS Belgic on April 16th, 1919. Private Armstrong received discharge from the CEF on April 29th, 1919. After the war, Noble married Florence Victoria Ausmus, and went to work for the Canadian Pacific Railway. On June 11th 1972 Noble Wicketts Armstrong died at Shaughnessy Hospital, Vancouver B.C. (vital statistics records, B.C. Archives). He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Ashton, Robert Payne (Private)

Service Number: 826130. Robert Payne Ashton was born at Stockton on Tees, Durham, England on August 1, 1887 to parents Joseph Ashton and Adelaine Parker. Ships passenger lists (LAC) suggest he landed in Quebec City in June of 1912, with final destination listed as Victoria. On January 21st, 1915 Robert married Alice Webster at St. Michaels Anglican Church, Royal Oak. (Alice's brothers Arthur James, Ernest, Frederick, and Henry Charles also served - see Webster entries below). On February 21st, 1916, he signed Attestation Papers, listing his address as Wilkinson Rd., Colquitz P.O. He stated he was married with an infant son. His occupation at that time was butcher. Interestingly, he listed his religion as The Society of Friends. Also of note, his birthdate was listed as August 1, 1889, not 1887. Robert was assigned to the 143rd Overseas Battalion, CEF, reg. #826130. Parents “Joe” and “Ada” Ashton were listed as living in Royal Oak. Private R.P. Ashton was discharged from the army on February 8th, 1917, deemed medically unfit for service. He had developed a right inguinal hernia “caused by falling down during drill”. He had pain on exertion and had refused an operation to fix the hernia. He did not see service outside of Canada. Robert died on September 8th, 1962 at the Veterans Hospital. His occupation was listed as Civil Servant, Department of Fisheries. He is buried at Royal Oak Burial Park and has a military head stone. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker and D. Cino.  Attestation Papers

Askey, John Sambridge

Service Number: 2583320. John Sambridge Askey was born on November 29, 1861 in Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire, England. He lived on Battleford Avenue, Saanich, British Columbia. On October 18, 1917, John joined the 50th Gordon Highlanders of Canada. He served as an M.P. at Willows Camp and Work Point Barracks in Victoria, and was also a member of the Home Guard. John married Annie Askey (nee Foster) in Victoria. They had 5 sons: William, Fred, George, James, and Guilford. John Sambridge Askey died on May 26, 1932 in Victoria. Information submitted by: Jim Askey.  Attestation Papers | Photos [PDF - 222 KB]

Askey Joseph Sambridge (Sergeant)

Joseph Sambridge Askey was John S. Askey’s son from a previous marriage. Joseph was born in Hanley, England in 1882. He lived on Carey Road in Saanich. On October 7, 1909, he married Gertrude Askey (nee Munro) in Victoria. They had an adopted son named Joseph Askey. Joseph served overseas in the Canadian Army as a Cavalryman. Gertrude Askey died on February 24, 1941 in Victoria at the age of 57. Joseph Sambridge Askey died in Victoria in 1943 at the age of 60. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: Jim Askey. 

Asprey [Aspray] Owen Talbot (Trooper)

Service Number: 107066. Owen Talbot Aspray was born in London, England on December 12th, 1880 to parents Thomas Neville and Emily Aspray. He immigrated to Canada in 1900 (LAC 1911 census). On November 1, 1910, Owen married Matilda Collier in Victoria. They had two daughters: Emily Matilda born 1911, and Annette Ada Violet born in 1913 (B.C. Archives Vital Statistics). The Asprays are listed as living on Tolmie Avenue in the 1911 census (Ward 2, Page 33). Owen gives his occupation at this time as a teamster. At Willows Camp on December 11th, 1914, Owen Aspray enlisted in the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles, reg. #107066. He lists previous military experience in the Imperial Yeomanry for a duration of one year and 192 days. The address given for his wife was 10 Sims St, Maywood P.O. Private Aspray landed in France on September 22nd, 1915 and was promoted to Lance Corporal on March 6th, 1916. While serving in Ypres, he “caught a chill in the trenches”. Pain in his back and legs and increasing jaundice sent him to hospital in England. His condition was quite grave for a while, but eventually he started to get better and was sent off to a convalescent home in Woodcote Park, Epsom. Diagnosis: Infectious Jaundice, or Hepatitis as we now call it. Owen returned to active duty on September 18th, 1916. Promotions followed: L. Sergeant on June 13th 1917, and Sergeant by July 14th of the same year. Sergeant Aspray is reported wounded in action twice, on September 15th 1917, and October 27th, 1917 at which time he received injuries to his hands and face. January of 1918 finds him assigned to be an “Instructor to Canadian Corps School”. On August 7th, 1918, Owen is “transferred to England with a view to being granted a commission”. He officially became Lieutenant Owen Talbot Aspray on November 23rd, 1918 and was assigned to the 1st Central Ontario Regiment. Aspray returned to Canada on board the Empress of Britain and received his discharge in Victoria on March 19th, 1919. On March 31st, 1948, Owen Talbot Aspray died at St. Joseph’s Hospital, Victoria. His death registration lists his occupation as “Returned Soldier”. His address was 68 Sims Avenue. He is buried in the Royal Oak Burial Park. Owen Talbot Aspray is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Atwood Pte T.

Baldwin, Edward Samuel (Private)

Service Numbers: A30639 and 524820. Edward Samuel Baldwin was born in Farthinghoe, Northampshire, England, on June 7th, 1891 to parents Edward Baldwin and Jane Coles. He was living with his mother Jane Robinson on Kent Rd., Maywood PO at the time of his enlistment. Baldwin has two sets of attestation papers, one for March 18th, 1915, reg. #A30639 which is marked on the top with “discharged” and a second set on April 3rd, 1916 reg. #524820 also signed in Victoria. The first papers list his occupation as teamster, and the second set as a pipe fitter. Edward stated that he was the main financial support for his widowed mother estimating that support at $50/ month. She received a separation allowance of $20/month. In 1915, he was assigned to the 1st Field Ambulance Service where he served in France. On his second set of attestation papers it is noted he “has a scar on his left parietal region as the result of a 1915 accident”. Medical records also note he suffered with pleurisy in 1915. His second landing in England was July 31st, 1916. He was assigned to the Canadian Army Medical Training Depot, Shorncliffe. Edward arrived in France again on September 11th, 1916. May 20th 1917 saw him attached to the 1st Army School of Cooking. On March 26th 1918 he was promoted to Lance Corporal and on May 1st 1918 to Lance Sargent. Edward was diagnosed with Influenza in April of 1919 but it is recorded he made a good recovery. On July 14th, 1919 Lance Sargent Baldwin was discharged. Edward married Gwendolyn Annie Jones on September 26th, 1925 in Victoria. He died at St. Joseph’s Hospital on December 22nd, 1956. At that time his address was 106 Ladysmith Street. His occupation was machinist’s helper. Edward Samual Baldwin is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Baldwin, James (Private)

Service Number: 28592. Robert James Baldwin was born April 5th, 1894 in Oxfordshire, England to parents Robert Baldwin and Jane Cotes. He is the brother of Pte. E.S. Baldwin, (also on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll). James signed up in Victoria on August 7th, 1914 and signed his attestation papers on September 23rd, 1914 in Valcartier Quebec. He was assigned to the 16th Battalion CEF. At the time of his enlistment Baldwin gave his occupation as labourer. His mother Jane Robinson of Maywood P.O. was listed as his next of kin. He married Margaret Ebborn on March 30th, 1915 in England. James developed measles, and his deployment to France was delayed until April 30th, 1915. On May 2nd, 1915 James was severely wounded at Festubert. “During a charge, a shell burst in front of him, the fragments wounding his left arm and leg. On being taken to the dressing station, it was found that he had a compound fracture of the arm and the bone of the left ankle shattered as well as wound to right shoulder and loin. At Ballieul 9 hours, then removed to Boulgne where ankle and arm were put in splits--remained 5 days”. All wounds became septic and draining. Sent back to England, he was operated on to remove bone and shell fragments. On April 8th, 1916, almost one year later, Baldwin was discharged from medical care, and deemed fit for permanent base duty. The recommendation was that he be assigned as an orderly at the Convalescent Hospital. By early 1917 he had been reclassified, and moved to the 4th Lab. Battalion as a cook. He was then sent back to Havre, France where he is quickly sentenced to 7 days Field Prison No. 2 for drunkenness while on active duty. On November 2nd, 1917 he was sentenced to 1 day F.P. for being “Absent from Reveille” the previous day. On November 13th, Private Baldwin was taken to the field hospital with “Disordered Action of the Heart”-- palpitations, rapid heartbeat, and shortness of breath on exertion. He was returned to England where he spent 93 days in various military hospitals undergoing medical investigation. He was deemed fit to return to duty on April 13th, 1918, and was transferred to the Forestry Corps where he was listed as a cook. On March 24th, 1919, Private Baldwin arrived in St John, New Brunswick and was demobilized. Robert James Baldwin died August 2nd, 1957 at the Veterans Hospital. At the time of his death his address is listed as 1259 Colville Rd, Esquimalt. His occupation is listed as retired janitor for HMC Dockyards. James Baldwin is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Ballantyne, Allan David (Private)

Service Number: 2044002. Allan David Ballantyne was born on March 31 1896 in Victoria to David Todd Ballantyne and Alice Isabelle Allen. Both parents were born in Ontario. Allan's father was a printing compositor (type setter) for newspapers and later worked for Queen's Printer. At the time Ballantyne enlisted on September 2 1916, he was a florist who lived with his family in Lake Hill, Saanich at the corner of Quadra and McKenzie.

Ballantyne enlisted with the 5th Regiment Canadian Garrison Artillery. He was 5'7, had brown eyes, reddish hair and "very fresh complexion." In December 1916, Ballantyne transferred to the Divisional Ammunition Column, Canadian Expeditionary Force.

The Daily Colonist on December 15 1916 reported that the artillery draft Ballantyne was now associated with would take up quarters at Willows Camp. They would receive their new artillery uniforms -- puttees, bandoliers, spurs and other details of equipment. The paper noted that "artillery units seem to have a special attraction for Victorians."

On March 27 1917 Ballantyne was admitted to Irving House Military Hospital with T.B. Ballantyne was discharged for 6 days leave on April 18 1917. There are no other indications in Ballantyne's files of ill health, so it is presumed he was considered healthy enough to go to artillery training in Petawawa for spring / summer 1917. In May 1917, Ballantyne was promoted to "Bdr". Ballantyne left with a group of 27 men on May 22 1917. He appears to have been in training until September 1917.

Ballantyne sailed for England on the S.S. Olympic and arrived on December 7 1917. He was at Witley Camp until April 2 1918 when he went overseas to France. Upon arrival in England, Ballantyne's rank reverted to Gunner (no doubt so he could go overseas to the Front). On August 30 1918 Ballantyne was posted to the 1st Brigade CFA. At some point while he was overseas, his rank became Driver. Service records do not explain this.

Ballantyne was in France until March 26 1919 when he returned to England. He was at Bramshott Camp until mid-April, when he sailed on the S.S. Olympic to Halifax. On April 23 1919, Ballantyne's name was included in a list of Victoria-area men who had arrived from overseas.

Ballantyne returned to his work as a florist. In 1924, Ballantyne lived in Lake Hill with his recently retired father, brother Gordon Ballantyne (also a florist) and sister Hazel (a school teacher). Their mother had died a few years earlier. On a summer evening in August 1924, Allan's dad David Ballantyne and David's life-long friend Alexander McLachlan were walking along Saanich Road when they were struck by a car and thrown into a ditch. Both died. The hit and run turned into "Victoria's most sensational trial in years" A Dr. Boak was found guilty of criminal negligence and sentenced to 4 years imprisonment but later appealed.

By 1925, Ballantyne and his brothers Gordon and Clyde operated Ballantyne Bros. Florists on Fort Street. A 1926 advertisement in the Daily Colonist states that they were agents of Layritz nurseries. By 1935, Ballantyne was President of Ballantyne Bros. There were also greenhouses at North Quadra. In the 1945 Victoria area directories, Ballantyne is listed as the proprietor of North Quadra Florists, while his brothers operated Ballantyne Bros on Fort. By 1955, Ballantyne lived at 3971 Quadra and still operated North Quadra Florists.

In 1929, Ballantyne married Isabelle Rose Mildenhall, a piano teacher who often had musical evenings in their home with her students. Allan David Ballantyne died on February 5 1980. At that time, he was living on Rockland Avenue in Victoria. He left his widow, and at least one child.

Allan David Ballantyne is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Name submitted by: J. Clements. Biography prepared by: S.A. Warner. Sources: C.E.F. digitized service files; Canada Census; Victoria City Directories; British Colonist online; familysearch.org.  Attestation Papers

Ballantyne, Archibald (Private)

Service Number : 426443. Archibald Ballantyne was born in Lanarkshire Scotland, on November 14th, 1883. He immigrated to Canada around 1905. In the 1916 census, Archie was listed as living in the #22 Maple Creek district, Saskatchewan (LAC). On January 26th, 1915 he enlisted at Weyburn Saskatchewan with the 46th Battalion CEF. He listed previous military experience with the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, 1st Battalion. A Mrs. Andrew McKay, his sister in Scotland, was listed as his next of kin. Archie gave his occupation as blacksmith and farmer. Private Ballantyne served with the 46th Battalion in England from July to August of 1915. He was then transferred to the 8th Battalion CEF in France from August 1915 to September 26th, 1916. On March 8th of that year Archie sprained his left shoulder, falling into the trenches while marching to his billet. “He fell and landed on shoulder to prevent a worse fall.” He was sent to England for rehabilitation and on June 17th, 1916 rejoined his unit in France. Private Ballantyne was sentenced to 14 days in Field Prison #1 for drunkenness on July 20th, 1916, then a further 21 days on September 21st 1916 for “1.) Falling out of Ranks without permission on the Line of March. 2.) Being absent from unit 6:45pm till apprehended by M.F.P. a Omer at 9:25 pm. 3.) Conduct to the prejudice of good order and Military discipline. 4.) Drunk.” On September 29th, 1916 at the Battle of the Somme, Archie Ballantyne received a gunshot wound through his left upper arm resulting in a permanent muscular spiral paralysis of left arm with resulting left wrist drop and loss of function of first 3 digits of that hand. He was sent back to England and ultimately to Canada for assessment, treatment, and surgery. In Canada, Archie rehabilitated at the Tuxedo Park Military Hospital in Winnipeg from January 9th, 1917 till his military discharge on November 30th 1917 when he was deemed “Medically Unfit for War Service.” His record notes that he was staying after that at the Returned Soldiers Club, 1140 W. Pender St., Vancouver, B.C. It also notes that he married after his discharge. Archie Ballantyne died at the Royal Jubilee Hospital on August 4th, 1939. He was survived by his wife Margaret and they were living at 1563 Monterey Avenue, Oak Bay at that time. His occupation is listed as “Returned Soldier”. The death registration also notes that he had been living in the province for 22 months prior to his death (FamilySearch.org & BC Archives). Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Baney, Alfred (Private)

Service Numbers: 180424 and 2203462. Alfred Baney was born in London, England on January 24, 1863, ’69, or ’73, depending on which records are consulted. On November 6th, 1916 Alfred enlisted in Victoria with a birth year given of 1873. He was assigned to the 88th Battalion CEF. He was a carpenter living on Maplewood Road in Saanich at this time. He listed his next of kin as his brother George Baney, but did not know his whereabouts. Second contact was Mr. John Little, friend, of Marigold PO, Victoria. Alfred stated he was a Civil employee of Transport Service in France from January 30th, 1902 to May 9th, 1903 in the space for previous military service. He arrived in England on June 8th of 1916, but was sent back to Canada in December of the same year as medically unfit and overaged. On March 19th, 1917, Alfred re-enlisted, was accepted and assigned to the Railway Construction Corps CEF. This time he listed his year of birth as 1869, and his next of kin as his sister Emma Hamshire, of Forestgate, Essex, England. Baney arrived in England on August 22, 1917, and was dispatched to France in September. Once again Alfred was discharged for being “no longer physically fit for war service”, being “overaged” and having “bad teeth”, in November of 1917. Despite this it was noted in his record that he “has been able to carry on field duty. Never dropped out of a march.” He arrived back in Canada on February 21st, 1918. On March 25th 1918 Alfred underwent medical assessment for disability pension. It was determined that he was suffering from deafness, tinnitus that began six months previously. “He blames it on the heavy gun fire”. He had permanent nerve deafness. It was also noted that he was suffering from myalgia and arteriosclerosis. Sapper Alfred Baney died on March 27th 1945. His age was listed as 82 years and marital status was widowed. At the time of his death, Alfred was living at 176 Maddock Street, Victoria. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Barrett, King (Staff Sergeant)

Service Number: 430664. King Barrett was born in Birdbrook, Essex, England on January 16th, 1882 to parents George Barrett and Phoebe Orbell. Both King and his wife Minnie (nee Coles) were registered as living in the Nanaimo census district in 1911 (FamilySearch.org—no image available). On March 18th, 1915 he signed his attestation papers and was assigned to the 48th Battalion CEF. According to his discharge papers however, he was a Staff Sergeant with the 88th Victoria Fusiliers at that time having joined with them on August 6th, 1914. Barrett also listed previous military service with the 2nd R.W. Kents and the 10th Grenadiers. He listed his occupation as builder. King arrived in England on July 10th, 1915 and on October 5th, requested his rank be reverted to Corporal. He was appointed Lance Sergeant, and transferred to the Canadian Army Service Corps Training Division. On September 19th, 1915 King was reassigned to the Eaton Machine Gun Battery and CASC. He was promoted to Sergeant in February of 1916 and Staff Sergeant by March, when he was transferred to the #12 Depot Unit of Supply. St. Sergeant Barrett deployed to France on March 8th, 1916. He was seen multiple times for treatment of eczema while in France. Then, on August 5th, 1916, it was noted in his records that Barrett was to “proceed from unit and route to England to return to Shorncliffe as incompetent “. He was transferred to CASC TD Shorncliffe and a month later was hospitalized with tonsillitis. On November 13th, 1916, orders were given for King Barrett to proceed to Canada for discharge. His Military Character was noted as “Very Good”. He arrived in Quebec, was discharged and given a set of “civilian clothes”. His address at that time was Maywood PO, Victoria. In January of 1919 St. Barrett was living at 3500 Douglas Street, Victoria. At the time of Minnie’s death in 1970, the Barretts were living at 3990 Glanford Rd, Victoria. King Barrett died in Duncan B.C. at the age of 102 years, on April 8th, 1984. (B.C. Archives). He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Bartch Pte Herbert

Barter, Felton Charles  (Corporal)

Killed in Action 2 June 1916. Service Number: 431141. Felton Charles Barter was born on August 13th, 1874 in London, England. He married Alice Maude Flight in Stroud, Gloucestershire, England in 1902. F.C. Barter and his wife arrived in the Victoria area in approximately 1911, living at 3439 Bethune Avenue in Saanich. F.C. Barter was a plasterer, an occupation he still held at the time of his enlistment on June 12th, 1915. On his Attestation Papers he indicated that he had served for 12 years with the Royal Horse Artillery.

He left Victoria with the 48th Battery in 1915 and transferred to the 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles in England. The Colonist reported that he was on the firing line from October 1915 until 1916. F.C. Barter was reported Missing in Action in 1916 and was later declared Killed in Action, June 2nd 1916. He was 42 years old. His wife Alice continued to live in their home until her death in 1941. They did not have any children. The house on Bethune Avenue was demolished ca. 2015.

Felton Charles Barter is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial. In June 2016, Military Researcher Steve Clifford visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including the Menin Gate Memorial in Belgium. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives. Photographs courtesy of Steve Clifford.  Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves Commission | Canadian Virtual War MemorialMenin Gate Memorial | Name on Menin Gate Memorial

Bayntun, Andrew Henry (Corporal)

Killed in Action 24 March 1916. Service Number: 107102. In June 2016, Military Researcher Steve Clifford visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including Menin Road South Military Cemetery in Belgium. Photographs courtesy of Steve Clifford.  Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves Commission | Canadian Virtual War Memorial | Menin Road South Cemetery | Grave

Beaumont Pte Bert

Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student.

Beaumont, Garford (Sapper)

Although no record can be found on the LAC website at this time, a marriage registration provides a clue to the identity of this soldier. Garford Beaumont was born in Huntington, England on March 31st, 1887 to parents Charles Beaumont and Emily Walker. He immigrated to Canada, arriving in November of 1910, at St. Johns N.B. In the 1911 census (LAC), Garford is living in Saanich, Strawberry Vale area, with his brother Frank and his sister in law and two nephews. His occupation at that time is carpenter. On November 15th, 1916 Garford married Florence Mable Gaunt at St. Michaels All Angels Church in Royal Oak. His marriage registration papers show he is with the Royal Canadian Engineers, and living at Work Point Barracks in Esquimalt. Garford Beaumont died on October 17th, 1971. At the time of his death he was living at 1276 Gladstone Avenue. His daughter Audrey de Gaunt Beaumont signed his death registration papers. He is buried in the Hatley Memorial Gardens. Garford Beaumont is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Marriage Registration (BC Archives)

Bell, Alfred Calder (Driver)   

Killed in Action 2 September 1918. Service number 332833. Alfred Calder Bell was born on June 28th, 1880 in Newcastle on Tyne, England. He signed his attestation papers in Victoria on May 6th, 1916, and was assigned to the 62nd Battery, 15th OS Brigade CFA. His wife May is listed as next of kin and living Saanich, Mt. Tolmie P.O. May received a separation allowance of $20.00 per month while Alfred was overseas. Alfred embarked to England on September 11th, 1916. In May of 1917 he was treated in Bramshott for a “laceration of the scalp, and contusions of the leg when horses ran away upsetting wagon while on duty”. Bell was sent to France February 14th, 1918. He was killed in action September 2nd, 1918 and is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial. Wife May Bell was awarded a $180.00 gratuity, and granted a widows pension of $672.00 per year effective October 1st, 1918. Alfred was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal, posthumously. These were sent on to his widow. The Mother’s Cross was to be given to his mother in England, but was returned as she could no longer be located. Widow May Bell died on November 3rd, 1953 and is buried in St. Luke’s Churchyard, Saanich. Her son Alfred Bell signed her death registration. Alfred Calder Bell is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial and the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker. In September 2015, a group visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including the Vimy Memorial. Photographs courtesy of Gavin Cooper.  Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves Commission | Canadian Cemetery No. 2 at Vimy | Canadian Grave Marker

Berry, Ainger Roger (Private)

Service Number: 154419. Born on March 15, 1879 in London, within the sound of Bow Bells, he was the oldest of seven children. As a Boy Seaman in the Royal Navy in the early 1890s, he certainly had his fair share of adventure travelling the world by sea. But after being “bought out” early for the remainder of his indentured service to the Royal Navy, he decided to venture to Canada arriving in Montreal on the ship, the “Bavarian” in August 1904. Roger, who listed his profession as “Carpenter” on the Ship’s List, headed for Manitoba where he found work in Minnedosa. By 1906 however, he was living in Seattle and working in his profession. The main purpose of this journey had been to find a permanent home for the entire family including his aged parents. After a return trip back to England with positive news, my grandfather left Liverpool in May 1910 on the “Virginian”, again bound for Canada with the final destination being Victoria, British Columbia. Just two years later in 1912, he and his brothers had built a home large enough for the entire family of nine at 2525 Scott Street close to the corner of what is now Bay and Shelbourne Street. By late 1914 he had met my grandmother and the following year on June 7, 1915 they were married. A mere ten days later on June 17th, as affirmed on his Attestation Paper, my grandfather enlisted in Vernon as a Private in the 1st Canadian Pioneers Battalion, “A” Company. By now he was 36 years old, which at that time, was considered middle age. Excerpt from “Granddaughter on the Somme”, courtesy of Claudia Berry.  Attestation Papers | “Granddaughter on the Somme” by Claudia Berry [PDF - 638 KB] | Photos [PDF - 12.7 MB]

Berton, Mark Edward (Private)

Killed in Action 30 May 1916. Service Number: 430702. In June 2016, Military Researcher Steve Clifford visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including the Railway Dugout Burial Ground in Belgium. Photographs courtesy of Steve Clifford.  Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves Commission | Canadian Virtual War MemorialRailway Dugout Burial Ground | Grave

Betts, Pte Ralph C.

Bird, Geoffrey (Corporal)

Service number 77436. Geoffrey Bird was born on March 25th, 1873 in Niagara Ontario to parents John Sealy Bird and Madeline Mary Bird. In the 1911 census (found through Family Search.org) Geoffrey was living with his wife Isabel Ellen Bird, aged 39, born in Australia and his step-son William Rudolph Wisler, aged 16, also born in Australia. Geoffrey Bird is listed in the Henderson’s 1910-1911 Greater Victoria Directory as living at 290 Beach Drive, and in 1912 at the same address with an occupation of Poultry Fancier (breeder). 1913 finds him listed as owner of the Shoal Bay Poultry Farm, at the same address. On November 7th, 1914 Mr. Bird enlisted in the CEF 30th Battalion in Victoria. He gave his occupation as retired rancher from West Saanich Rd., Saanich. He stated he had previous military experience in the 50th Gordon Highlanders. Geoffrey arrived in England on March 8th, 1915 and was then dispatched to France. On May 5th 1915, Bird was wounded when he received a gunshot wound to the thigh/buttock area. He was sent to England for treatment of the flesh wound and was hospitalized between May 27th and June 4th of 1915. After his discharge he continued to serve in various areas in England. He was promoted to Sergeant on April 7th, 1916. Age caught up with Sgt. Bird. Medical records indicate he was suffering with rheumatism and lumbago worsened by the cold and damp. It was noted that he had these conditions prior to enlistment. In the 1915 directory his wife Isobel is listed living at 1610 Belcher St., and then it appears she made her way to England living in the Surrey/Kent area for the duration of the war. On July 31st of 1918, Sgt. G. Bird was found medically unfit for further service and discharged in Victoria, B.C. Upon discharge Geoffrey gives his address as 2287 Saratoga Avenue, Oak Bay and also The Union Club. The last time a record of Geoffrey Bird has been located is in the 1920 Henderson Victoria Directory with a residency at 5-2451 Newport St., Oak Bay. No further records for Bird or any of the other members of his family have been found at this time. Geoffrey Bird is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Birkett, Frank (Army Sergeant)

Service number: 703101. Frank Birkett was born in England on April 3rd, 1858 to Thomas Birkett and Caroline Gaylor. He immigrated to Canada in 1898 with his wife Eliza Annie (nee Cox) and children Frank, Nora, and Phillip. Daughter Edith was born in Vancouver, B.C. In the 1901 Census they are shown living in the Burrard district, and in the 1911 Census, in Vancouver. On December 17th, 1915 Frank enlisted in Victoria, stating his year of birth as being 1866. He gave his occupation as gunsmith. At the time of enlistment the Birketts were living on Jasmine Avenue, Garden City, Victoria. He stated he served for 3 years with the 1st Warwickshire Volunteer Battalion in England. Frank was assigned to the 102nd Battalion Comox- Atlin, CEF. His medical on enlistment noted a right inguinal hernia and some hearing problems. He was further assessed during his training in Comox. On May 6th, 1916, it is written, “This man says this hernia has never troubled him, he is otherwise physically fit. He is recommended for overseas service being an expert Armourer and these men are most difficult to secure. He is an invaluable man to this battalion.” Frank arrived in Liverpool, England on June 29th, 1916 and was promoted to Acting Sergeant. He landed in Havre, France on August 12th, 1916. He was promoted to Sergeant on September 9th, 1916. On November 5th, 1916 Sgt. Birkett was transferred to the Canadian Ordinance Corps, and on September of the following year, to the Canadian Light Horses as an Armourer. He was promoted to Staff Sergeant. On February 26th, 1918 Frank returned to England and was thereafter posted to the Gun Depot for duty. He was having increasing difficulty with his hernia, and his hearing was failing dramatically. It was also noted that he must wear glasses for reading. He was discharged to Canada on July 13th, 1918, and admitted to the Esquimalt Military Hospital. Medical exam stated: “Condition on admission. Man past military age. Almost totally deaf left ear, reduced hearing right ear. Hernia, no surgery recommended.” It was noted that the heavy lifting of the armaments overseas has aggravated his condition. His rank was reduced to Sergeant on his return to Canada. Sergeant Frank Birkett was discharged on December 31st, 1919. During his time overseas, wife Eliza Annie received a separation allowance of $25.00 per month. This was stopped immediately when he was sent back to Canada. Frank Birkett died on January 12th, 1949 in the Veterans Hospital, Victoria. He is buried in the Colwood Burial Park. His address at the time of his death was 500 Grange Rd., Victoria. His occupation was still listed as gunsmith. Frank Birkett is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker. References: Library Archives of Canada, B.C. Archives, FamilySearch.org.  Attestation Papers

Birkett, Nora (Sister)

Nora Birkett was born in Birmingham England on October 25th, 1886 to parents Frank Birkett and Eliza Ann Cox. She immigrated to Canada in 1898, with her parents and siblings Frank and Phillip. Sister Edith was born while the family was living in Vancouver. The 1901 census shows the family living in the Burrard District, and the 1911 census, in Vancouver. Nora went into nurses training at the Royal Jubilee Hospital, class of 1909. She joined the Canadian Medical Corps on July 30th, 1915 in Esquimalt B.C., and was one of the inaugural members from British Columbia of the #5 Canadian General Hospital. Sister Birkett signed her attestation papers on September 16th, 1915, in London England. Her mother Eliza who was living on Grange Rd., was listed as next of kin. Nora’s monthly income was approximately $81.60 per month of which $30.00 was sent to her mother as a separation allowance. Nora served six weeks in France before being sent to Salonika where the Canadian Army had a large “hospital” in a compound surrounded by miles of barbed wire which became known as “the birdcages”. Conditions in Salonika were brutal, cold in winter and malarial in summer from the surrounding mosquito infested swamps. The hospital was always at capacity with wounded from Gallipoli as well as the Serbian front. Overwork and poor conditions eventually caught up with Nora. She was sent back to England on the hospital ship Llandovery Castle, arriving on September 27th, 1916. Her medical report reads “Debilitated condition since June 1916 when she was in hospital with PVD for 23 days. Sleeps poorly. Appetite poor. Expected time off, three months.” Another report on September 29th, 1916 grants her disability for “strain of duties”. “This nursing sister has seen six weeks in France and seven months in Salonika. While in Salonika had severe Herpes Zoster (shingles) right side and was generally run down and debilitated.” She was transferred to Vincent Square Hospital for convalescence. When she was deemed fit to return to duty, Nora served at the Canadian General Hospital CANC Training School, Canadian Officers Hospital, Yarrow, #4 Canadian General Hospital, Granville Canadian Specialty Hospital, and the #16 Canadian General Hospital. On August 23rd, 1919, Sister Nora Birkett was discharged from service and granted a war service gratuity of 4 years. She married David Angus Rose on July 19th, 1921 at First Presbyterian Church in Victoria. They had at least one child, a son David Rose. Nora died on August 21st, 1962, at Mt. St. Mary’s Hospital in Victoria. Despite all that she did as a professional nurse during the war, her occupation on her death registration is listed as “home duties”. Nora Birkett is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Bobbett, Thomas (Private)

Service number: 706805. Thomas Bobbett was born on December 3rd, 1897 in Bristol England to parents Albert Bobbett and Emily Parfitt. On January 24th, 1916 Thomas enlisted in Victoria and was assigned to the 103rd Battalion CEF. At this time he was living at Keating with his father Albert, and employed as a ranch hand. Thomas arrived in England on July 31st, 1916 and was sent to France on December 23rd. On May 5th, 1917 he was gassed on the line and consequently invalided until June, when he returned to the front lines. Unfortunately for Private Bobbett he was once again the victim of a gas attack on June 14th, 1917 and did not return to active service until October 13th that year. On February 16th, 1918 Thomas was promoted to Lance Corporal. He was wounded once again on August 17th, 1918 but this time his injuries were gunshot wounds to his chest and ear. His injuries must have been superficial as he was still on the lines when he suffered shrapnel wounds to his leg on September 10th, 1918. Lance Corporal Thomas Bobbett embarked for Canada on March 17th, 1919 aboard the SS Olympic and was discharged from the army on April 2nd, 1919. On November 9th, 1923, Thomas married Emma Luela Templeton Carson in Vancouver, B.C. At the time he was working for the Canadian Pacific Railway. Thomas and Emma had at least one child, Thomas Carson Bobbett, born December 11th, 1924 in Vancouver. Thomas Bobbett died on May 26th, 1957 at Shaughnessy Hospital in Vancouver. (B.C. Archives records). He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Bolton, William (Private)

Service number: 1013034. William Bolton was born in Thakeham, Sussex, England on November 16th, 1873. He enlisted in the CEF on December 16th, 1916 and was assigned to the 230th Forestry Battalion. At the time of his enlistment, he was living at R M D #1 Royal Oak, with his wife Mary Ada, and children Florence Mary aged 15, Frederick Andrew William aged 5, and Margaret Hannah aged 4. He lists his occupation as farmer, although later records list him as a logger. In his absence Mary was given a separation allowance of $20-25.00 per month. He was sent overseas on February 5th, 1917 and then to France on the 19th of that month. By January of 1918, William was reported as sick, suffering from chest pain and shortness of breath. He eventually was sent to hospital in England for assessment and deemed medically unfit for further service with cardiac problems. Private Bolton returned to Canada on board the Llandovery Castle on May 6th 1918, and on to the Victoria Military Hospital in Esquimalt. On June 7th 1918 he received his final discharge from the military. William Bolton died on January 26th, 1935 at St. Joseph’s Hospital, Victoria from the same cardiac problems diagnosed during his time in the CEF. At the time of his death he was residing on Old West Saanich Rd. in Saanich. He is buried in the Royal Oak Burial Park. William Bolton is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. (B.C. Archives, genealogy records/Family Search.org). Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Booth, Herbert (Trooper)

Service number: 107115. Herbert Booth was born on January 1st 1878 in Stockport, Cheshire, England to parents George Edward Booth and Kate Walters. He enlisted in the 2nd Regiment Canadian Mounted Rifles (B.C. Horse) on November 16th, 1914 in Victoria. Booth states he served from 1900-1905 with the Calcutta Light Horse. At the time of his enlistment he indicated he was employed as a Financial Agent and Farmer. He listed his next of kin as a brother and sister in St. Anne’s on Sea, Lancashire, England. Henderson’s Directories show him in various employment. In 1910-11, he is listed as an assistant to A. W. Bridgeman and lived at “Rockabella” 806 Quadra Street; in 1912 Herbert gave his occupation as real estate at #7 Bridgeman Building; and 1913 he was an agent for B.C. City and Suburban Properties Ltd, at 1007 Government St. He was still living at Rockabella. After arriving in England, Herbert qualified to be a “bomb thrower” and was sent to France on September 19th, 1915. As a result of this physically demanding job, Herbert developed two inguinal hernias and was sent to England in October of 1916 for surgery. After his recovery, he remained in England for the duration of the war. Private Booth returned to Canada upon the SS Olympia and was discharged on January 21st, 1919. On August 15th, 1922, Herbert married Alice Orma Edna Henry, a high school teacher, at Christ Church Cathedral in Vancouver, B.C. Herbert Booth died on September 5th, 1947 suddenly, at the Superior Meat Market on Fort Street. At the time of his death records show he was the Manager of Imports for Arnhold and Co. Ltd and lived in Shanghai, China. He was transported to Orillia, Ontario for burial. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. (BC Archives—Birth, Death, and Marriage Records). Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Bradshaw, Beatrice Eugene (Nursing Sister)

Beatrice Eugene Bradshaw was the daughter of Sarah Payne Windsor and William George Bradshaw. A few years after her father's death, her mother, uncle and siblings moved to Victoria.  The family lived in a home at 3701 Palo Alto Street in the Mount Tolmie area of Saanich. She enlisted with the Canadian Expeditionary Force in 1918, a year after her graduation from The Royal Jubilee Hospital School of Nursing. She served at the #11 Canadian General Hospital at Shorncliffe, England. Beatrice later worked as a school nurse in Victoria. She passed away in Oak Bay in 1945. Beatrice is buried at St. Luke's Cemetery with two of her sisters. Information submitted by: B.Ellison. Sources: The Daily Colonist (Sat 1 Jun 1918, p.6). Photo: grave of Beatrice Bradshaw, St Luke's Cemetery, Saanich (courtesy B.Ellison). Excerpt from Oral History interview by Madeline Howden (nee Bradshaw): "And then Trix was a nurse at the Jubilee and as soon as she was through, she went off to the war.  I think I have an awfully nice picture of Trix.  Trix was very pretty." "Trix was a school nurse". Source: Saanich Archives Oral History Collection.   Interview excerpts [PDF - 71 KB] | Royal Jubilee School of Nursing Archives [PDF - 65 KB] Grave Marker | Photo 

Bradshaw, Hannah Jennings (Nursing Sister)

Hannah ”Nance” Jennings Bradshaw was the second daughter of Sarah Payne Windsor and William George Bradshaw. She was born in 1891 in Placentia, Newfoundland. A few years after her father's death, her mother, uncle and siblings moved to Victoria.  The family lived in a home at 3701 Palo Alto Street in the Mount Tolmie area of Saanich. Nance graduated from The Royal Jubilee Hospital School of Nursing in 1915 and went overseas with the #5 Canadian General Hospital that same year. On September 14th, 1915, Nance enlisted with the Canadian Expeditionary Force in London, England. She was stationed in Shorncliffe, England, Heliopolis, Egypt and Salonika, Greece. While overseas, Nance married Major James Thomas Wall, a physician and surgeon born in Nanaimo, also with #5 Canadian General Hospital. Information submitted by: B.Ellison. Sources: The Daily Colonist (Sun 9 Mar 1919, p.9), (Wed 22 Sep 1915, p.5), (Sun 8 Aug 1915, p.12). Excerpt from Oral History interview by Madeline Howden (nee Bradshaw): "We were the first generation of girls who'd ever had to earn a living.  But that's why Mother came to Victoria.  She knew we'd have to earn our own livings.  So my sister Ethel was a stenographer, Nancy was a stenographer, but changed to be a nurse and she went off to the First World War.  And she was down in Gallipoli during the war." Source: Saanich Archives Oral History Collection.  Interview excerpts [PDF - 71 KB] | Royal Jubilee School of Nursing Archives [PDF - 65 KB]

Brasier, Francis Sidney (Sergeant)

Francis Sidney Braiser was born in Bromley Kent, England November 2nd, 1885. In 1908, he married Elizabeth Simpson in West Brommich, Staffordshire, England. He died at Shaughnessy Hospital in Vancouver on April 24th, 1944. His wife predeceased him in 1923. He is buried at Mt. View Cemetery in Vancouver B.C. His occupation on his death certificate is that of a carpenter, still working until the time of his death, and it is noted that he was a soldier (for burial). In Henderson’s 1920 directory Francis is living at 3389 Whittier in Saanich, and on his wife’s death registration in 1923, they are living at 3323 Tennyson Avenue, Saanich. No military records have been digitalized at this time. Francis Sidney Brasier is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.

Brewer, Harry (Sergeant Major)

Service number: 180182. Harry Brewer was born in Cranbourne, Dorsetshire, England on April 22nd, 1880. At the time of his enlistment he was living with his wife Adie Brewer (nee. Taylor) at 3487 South Street, Maywood PO, Cloverdale, in Saanich. He was working as a mechanic. On November 6th, 1915, Harry enlisted in Victoria and was assigned to the 88th Battalion Victoria Fusiliers. He states that he had served previously, 7 ½ years with the Hampshire Regiment and was in South Africa from 1899-1902. Harry received a series of promotions and by the time he arrived in England in June of 1916, he was a Staff Sergeant with the 2nd Detachment Canadian Garrison Regiment. Sgt. Brewer went on to qualify as an Anti-Gas Instructor. Harry was then promoted to Company Sergeant Major in June of 1916. By the end of December 1916, he was assessed by the medical board, and it was found “This man has a deformed foot from an old injury and is unable to do any route marching.... For permanent base duty.” In June of 1917, Sgt. Major Brewer was sent back to Canada for discharge as the medical board had deemed him no longer fit for general duty. The medical board in Toronto, however, disagreed and found him fit for special duties in Canada. His wife Adie has been receiving a separation allowance of $25-27/month in his absence. Sgt. Maj. Harry Brewer remained in Toronto, and his wife Adie joined him there. At the time of his discharge on June 16th, 1919, they were living at 151 Close Avenue in Toronto. Records can be found for three of his children: daughter Adie Margery (married J. E. Tayor in Victoria), Harry John (married Caroline W. Hudson in 1922 in N.S.) and Charlie George (died in Victoria 1929). Harry Brewer died on November 9th, 1945 and is buried in the Prospect Cemetery, Toronto, Ontario. Sources: B.C. Archives & Familysearch.org. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Brewer, Gilbert Mark (Private)

Service number: 180413. Gilbert Mark Brewer was born January 22, 1890, in Cranborne, Dorset, England to Frank and Louise Brewer. On November 6th, 1915 he signed his attestation papers in Victoria, stating his given name was Thomas Brewer. Father Frank is listed as next of kin living at Manor Farm, Cranborne nr. Salisbury, England. He stated he was employed as a logger. Harry Brewer signed as his witness and in fact, Harry signed his own attestation papers on the same day. Thomas was assigned to the 88th Battalion, CEF. On discharge he noted his service as: 7 months in militia in Canada, 6 ½ months in Canada with the 88th Battalion, 8 ½ months in England with the 88th, and 30th Battalion and B.C.R.D., and 26 ½ months in France with the 7th Battalion. He attained the rank of Lance Corporal while serving in Canada, but requested reverting to Private prior to deploying overseas. Like so many Canadian soldiers in England, Thomas/Gilbert contracted measles in August of 1916, sending him to the isolation hospital for three weeks. Recovering from that, he then contracted influenza, which hospitalized him from December 1st, 1916 to March 6th, 1917. Thomas Brewer signed a legal document in October of 1918 stating his proper name was Gilbert Mark Brewer, not Thomas as he wrote on his attestation papers. He was granted permission to marry along with two weeks leave in December 1918. Thus he then had a wife, Florence Mary (maiden name unknown). Gilbert returned to Canada and was discharged from the CEF on July 7th, 1919. He and Florence were living at 501 Kelvin Rd, Victoria, B.C. at that time. Gilbert Mark Brewer died on November 25th, 1977 at the Royal Jubilee Hospital. At the time of his death he was residing at 4746 West Saanich Rd. His trade was listed as wood finisher and construction. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. References: B.C. Archives, Familysearch.org. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Brown Lce Cpl H.W.

Bryson Pte George

Bukin, Ernest Daniel (Private)

Ernest Daniel Bukin was born on December 18th, 1880 in London, England to father [first name undetermined] Bukin, and mother Matilda Cherfers. He married Dorcas Amy Herbert in England and had at least two children while still in England: Ernest Charles Adam, and Dolly May. The family immigrated to Canada in 1912. On September 21st, 1913, Dolly May died of “phosphorus poisoning after eating matches.” She was about 20 months old at the time, and the family was living on Sims Avenue. Ernest died on February 10th, 1966 at a residence on Marigold Avenue. His place of residence at that time was listed as RR #7, Munns Rd., Highlands. Ernest’s profession was listed as a motorman with B.C. Electric. Another daughter, [Gerta?] R. Davidson of Marigold Avenue signed his death registration papers. His wife Dorcas lived to be 100 years of age and died at Gorge Rd. Hospital on November 15th, 1983. At the present time, no military records can be found for Mr. Bukin. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Reference sources: B.C. Archives, FamilySearch.org. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.

Burton, Raymond Clifford (Private)

Killed in Action 13 June 1916. Service Number: 431142. In June 2016, Military Researcher Steve Clifford visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including the Maple Copse Cemetery in Belgium. Photographs courtesy of Steve Clifford.  Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves Commission | Canadian Virtual War MemorialMaple Copse Cemetery | Grave

Butcher, Harry Uridge (Private)

Service # 77859. Harry Uridge Butcher was born in West Wickham, Kent, England on July 7th, 1881 to father Charles Butcher and mother Hester West. Butcher signed his Attestation Papers on November 23rd, 1914 in Victoria and was assigned to the 30th Battalion, CEF. His occupation was listed as lather. After going overseas, he served with the 16th Battalion in France. His wife Amy (nee Marchant) was listed as next of kin and her address was Lot 20, Falmouth Rd., Victoria, Lakehill P.O. In his absence, Amy received a separation allowance of $15-20/month. Eight months after Harry signed up, Amy gave birth to a son, Uridge Ernest Butcher, born June 8th, 1915. On June 2nd, 1916, Harry received severe shrapnel wounds to his left arm and was sent to the Mill Rd. Infirmary in Liverpool for two weeks to recover. His daughter Ivy Eleanor died of pneumonia following the measles on March 22nd, 1917 in Victoria. She was 12 years old. There are frequent references to complaints of neuritis, myalgia and rheumatism in Harry’s medical records. Following orders and maintaining military discipline seemed to have been problematic for Private Butcher, starting in 1916. In February 1916, he was charged with being absent from Tattoo, and forfeited 3 day’s pay. Then, in April he was charged with refusing to obey an order. June of 1916 found Harry docked another 3 day’s pay and 7 days of detention for overstaying a pass by 33 hours. On October 26th, 1917 he forfeited 3 day’s pay for being absent from his billet after 10pm. Not one to change his ways, Pte. Butcher was sentenced to 7 days forfeiture of pay for: “1) Neglecting to obey an order given by an NCO, 2) Resisting arrest, 3) Making a false statement about NCO”. On June 3rd, 1918 it continued with forfeiture of 6 day’s pay for WOAS, and then on the 7th, a further day’s wages for “being absent without leave 10pm 6/6/18 until apprehended by MP in café at 7:20am”. At the end of the war, records show Harry was working as a cook. He was discharged in Vancouver on March 5th, 1919. Pte. Butcher served four years and three months in the CEF. Henderson’s 1921 Directory shows Harry living at 3454 Bethune in Saanich and working once again as a lather. Harry Uridge Butcher died at the Veteran’s Hospital on October 7th, 1952. He is buried at the Veteran’s cemetery in Esquimalt. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. References: B.C. Archives, FamilySearch.org, Henderson’s Directory of Victoria, 1921. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Butterfield, Alfred John

Service # 430575. Alfred John Butterfield was born on April 1st, 1893 in Ulverston, Lancashire, England. The 1911 Canadian Census shows Alfred living with his parents James and Mary, along with siblings Fred, William, and Helena in Victoria. He enlisted in the CEF and was assigned to the 48th Battalion on March 18th, 1915. At the time he was living with his father James and several other Butterfields at 475 Obed Avenue in Saanich. He was an articling pupil to the B.C Land Surveyors at the time. His father is listed in the Henderson directory as a surveyor. On April 24th, 1916 while serving in France, Butterfield received a gun-shot wound to the right leg which was severe enough to return him to Canada. He was admitted to the Edmonton Military Hospital and remained there from May 2nd, 1916 to August 8th, 1916. At this time he was deemed fit for duty and sent back to England, assigned to the 3rd Canadian Pioneers. While overseas, his assigned pay was sent to his aunt, Elizabeth Wallbank, at Green Lane Farm, Cark in Caltmel, Lancashire. On February 20th, 1917 Butterfield was discharged from the CEF, “having been appointed to comm., Imperial Army.” No further records of him have been found, although his family is still living on Obed Avenue in the 1920 directory. References: Henderson’s Directories of Victoria, FamilySearch.org, Library Archives of Canada. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Butterfield, E. (Trooper)

The only records found to date are for an Ernest Butterfield, Architect business 206 Hibben Bone Block, home Gorge Rd. in the 1918 Henderson’s directory. Possibilities on immigration records in 1911 and 1913 to Halifax, returned Canadian to Victoria. No military, war grave, death or marriage records have been located at this time. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Additional source: Building the West: the early architects of British Columbia by Donald Luxton (2003). Information submitted by: V. Minaker.

Button, Alfred Thomas (Corporal)

Service Number: 430853. Alfred Thomas Button was born on July 15th, 1894, in Peckham, London, England. Before he joined the war he was a salesman. He had prior military experience. He was with the Light Railway Construction Company. He enlisted at age 30 in Victoria, British Columbia. He was in the Canadian Railway Troops after he joined. He was wounded but survived the war and lived to be 69 years old. He died on May 7, 1953. Alfred Thomas Button is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: Spectrum Community School Student, Library Science course (Grade 10 & 11).  Attestation Papers

Button, Arthur Frederick (Sergeant)

Service Number: 43578. Arthur Frederick Button was, according to his attestation papers, born on March 21st, 1890 in London, England to parents Alfred Button and Alice (nee Reid). He signed his papers in Rimouski, Quebec on September 28th, 1914. At the time of his enlistment, Arthur was working as a painter in Saskatchewan. He listed his wife Sadie as next of kin, with an address of Milestone Sask. P. O. His marriage to Sadie Early was given as October 15th, 1903, and they had two children, Florence born in Toronto on April 29th, 1905, and Charlie born in Victoria on September 3rd, 1908. Previous military experience was listed as serving with the 12th Calvary, U.S. Army from 1905-1908. Button was assigned to the Divisional Ammunition Column. In the 1916 census, Arthur was listed as overseas, and his wife and children were living at 2078 Halifax St. Regina, Sask. His service record shows him with the Canadian Field Artillery 26th Battery as a driver. On December 19th, 1914, he was promoted to bombardier, and then became Acting Sergeant on January 1915. In February of 1915, Button arrived in France. He was a Sergeant by April of 1916, and Warrant Officer (Battalion Sergeant Major) by February of 1917. He was mentioned in dispatches on June 8th, 1917. Sgt. Button had a will on record dated April of 1915 stating that in the event of his death, “I give the whole of my property and money to Mrs. Alice Button, my mother, of Cadillac Avenue, Maywood P.O. Victoria”. It was at this time that his mother’s name appeared as a recipient of a portion of his separation allowance. In 1918, Sgt. Button was granted a furlough to Canada from February 23rd, 1918 to May 23rd, 1918. In early June it was stated that he “ceases to be on furlough -- retained in Canada”. Medical records show he was suffering from varicose veins, tonsillitis, and a hammer toe. The report stated that these conditions were caused by “1) Wearing puttees in wet weather, 2) Exposure, 3) Strain of service. The hammer toe interferes with walking. Issue of ill-fitting boots causing hammer toe. Recommend light duties in Canada”. He was assigned to the 10th Canadian Garrison Regiment on May 25th, 1918 to September 1st, 1918. Sergeant Button served 3 years and 5 weeks in the European Campaign. He was discharged from the CEF on August 31st, 1918 in Winnipeg Manitoba, being deemed medically unfit for further service. Arthur had at least one other son, Arthur Alfred, born in Winnipeg on January 30th, 1920. It is suspected that he had a second son, Frederick Sydney, born in Winnipeg on February 11th, 1921 and killed in action in France on August 8th, 1944. In the 1940 directories, Arthur Alfred is living at the same address, 715 Cook St., Victoria, that is listed on Frederick Sydney’s death registration papers. Arthur Frederick Button died on September 14th, 1959 at Veterans Hospital. His birth year was listed as 1887, which differs from his attestation papers. He was living with his wife, Martha Wallace, at 401 Davida St. in Saanich. He is buried in the Royal Oak Burial Park. Arthur Frederick Button is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. References: B.C. Archives, FamilySearch.org, LAC, 1916 census. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Button, Sydney George (Private)

Service Number: 1226. Sydney George Button was born, according to his attestation papers, on April 31st, 1895 at Walthanstowe, Sussex, England to parents Alfred Button and Alice (nee Reid). He signed his attestation papers on November 15th, 1914 in Victoria and was assigned to the 4th Field Ambulance. At the time he listed his place of residence as Cadillac Avenue, Parkdale, Victoria and his mother as next of kin, same address, c/o Maywood P.O. His occupation was seaman. Sydney arrived in England April 29th, 1915, and shortly thereafter began a series of conflicts with Military discipline. On June 11th, 1915 he was “awarded 14 days, CB (confined to barracks) and 2 day’s pay for sleeping on duty.” On July 3rd, he received another 14 days CB with loss of pay for being Absent With Out Leave. This repeated with an “award of 28 days of detention” for being AWOL from 11:30 pm August 29th, 1915 to September 7th, 1915. On September 9th of that year he was transferred to CAMC Training Depot at Shorncliffe and then on October 11th, 1915 to the #1 Canadian Stationary Hospital in Salonica. While serving in Salonica, Pte. Button contracted malaria and was hospitalized multiple times for severe outbreaks of the disease. In between hospital admissions, his behaviour appears to have showed no improvement. On April 4th, 1917 he was “awarded 28 days FP (Field Prison) for absence from 0800-1630 hrs” the previous day along with forfeiture of 1 day’s pay. This sentence had “2 days remitted for good conduct whilst undergoing punishment”. The good behavior was brief because on July 22nd 1917, Sydney was “awarded forfeiture of 10 day’s pay for breaking out of camp after tattoo 9pm on the 18th.” On July 29th, he was “awarded 28 days in FP #1, for being drunk and creating a disturbance in hospital.” His repeated severe outbreaks of malaria had interfered with his ability to report for duty and as such he was sent to England for further assessment. The Medical Board Proceedings summarized “Pte. Button was in hospital in Salonica with 6 severe attacks of malaria besides several minor ones. Since returning to England, was in CM Hospital Hastings 25/9/17-10/10/17 with another attack. Complains of headaches and chills at times……Classified C iii, not likely to be raised in category in 6 months.” Sydney sailed from Liverpool back to Canada on board the SS Saxonia on November 17th, 1917. He was sent to the military hospital at Work Point, and then on to Resthaven hospital in Sidney. Recommended treatment was “rest, good diet, outdoor exercise, with medication quinine.” His rank on discharge on September 3rd, 1918 was Gunner. His service with the CEF was listed as 9 months with the 4th Field Ambulance, 2 years with the #1 Canadian Stationary Hospital, Salonica. Sydney George Button died on January 14th, 1974 in Vancouver, B.C. His occupation was listed as Maintenance Foreman for Airline. His wife Mary Ellen Hutchinson signed his death registration papers and stated the year of his birth as 1898, not 1895 which was given on his attestation papers. References: B.C. Archives. Sydney George Button is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Butts, Frank (Private)

Killed in Action 9 April 1917. Service Number: 706476. Frank Butts was born, according to his attestation papers, on April 21st, 1897 in W. Hartlepool, England to parents James Henry Butts and Sarah (nee Bowman). In fact, his full name was James Henry Frank Butts, and he was born in 1899, not 1897, in W.Hartelpool, Durham, England. Frank signed up on March 3rd, 1916 in Victoria and was assigned to the 103rd Battalion, CEF. He listed his occupation as chauffeur. His parents were listed as next of kin and were living at 876 Brett Ave., Saanich, Maywood P.O. Frank arrived in England aboard the SS Olympic on July 31st, 1917. On September 29th of that year he wrote his will: “In the event of my death, I give the whole of my property and effects to my mother Mrs. S. Butts, Brett Ave, Maywood P. O., Victoria, B.C.” At this time he was a bugler with the 105th Battalion. Private Butts arrived in France on February 2nd, 1917 and, “in field” on February 24th. He transferred to the 4th Entry Battalion on the 28th of February and was again transferred on March 10th, to the 54th Battalion. Private Frank Butts was Killed In Action, April 9th, 1917. His final place of interment is the Bois-Carre British Cemetery, Thelus, France. He was 17 years old. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. References: Commonwealth War Graves Commission, B.C. Archives, FamilySearch.org. Information submitted by: V. Minaker. In September 2016, a group led by Gavin Cooper visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including the Bois-Carre British Cemetery in France. Photograph courtesy of Gavin Cooper.  Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves Commission | British Colonist 27 Apr 1917British Colonist 9 Apr 1919 | Grave

Caddell, Alex (Private)

Killed in Action 9 April 1917. Service Number: 706996. Alexander Caddell was born in Derrymacash, County Armagh, Ireland on September 9th, 1888. His father John Caddell is listed as living in Gilford, County Down, Ireland. Alex signed his attestation papers in Victoria on February 23rd, 1916. At that time he was living on Wilkinson Rd., Saanich (spelled Wilkerson Rd., Sannich, on papers) with his wife Catherine and three sons John aged 5 years, Alexander aged 3 ½, and James aged 1 year and 8 months. He listed his occupation as labourer. Pte. Caddell was assigned to the 103rd Battalion. He arrived in England on July 31st, 1916, and France on February 17th, 1917. On March 3rd he reported for duty “in field”. While still in England, Alex like all soldiers heading to the Front, wrote his will. “In the event of my death, I give the whole of my property and effects to my wife Mrs. Catherine Caddell, Wilkinson Rd., Saanich B.C.” Private Alexander Caddell was Killed In Action on April 9th, 1917, the first day of the battle of Vimy Ridge. He is buried at the Givenchy Road Canadian Cemetery, Neuville-St. Vaast. Catherine was receiving a separation allowance of $20 per month in his absence, and this was continued until it was confirmed that she would be receiving a widow’s pension, which occurred on July 4th, 1917. During this time Mrs. Caddell had moved, first with a Mrs. J.M. Cardwell of 71 Menzies St., Victoria, and then to 844 View St. At the time of her death in 1962, she lived at 648 Niagara St. Victoria. She was granted a War service Gratuity to Widows of $180 in 1920. Pte. Alexander Caddell is commemorated on the Canadian Virtual War Memorial and the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. References: B.C. Archives, FamilySearch.Org, CWGC. Information submitted by: V. Minaker. In September 2015, a group visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including the Givenchy Road Canadian Cemetery. Photographs courtesy of Gavin Cooper.  Attestation Papers | Canadian Virtual War Memorial| Commonwealth War Graves | Grave

Cambie, John Warner (Private)

Service Number: 2299483. John Warner Cambie was born in Cacouna, Quebec on August 17th 1883 to Irish-born parents Alexander Cambie and Elizabeth (nee Poston). In the 1911 Census he is listed as living in the Victoria City Sub-district 1-14 as a boarder. Henderson’s Directory of that year states he is a clerk for the Bank of Montreal, living at 1117 Fort St. In the directory of 1913, he is living at 453 Moss St. and is a salesman for H.S. Lott and Co. Then in 1915 while still living on Moss St., he lists his occupation as Real Estate. On February 14th, 1917, Cambie signed his attestation papers in London, England. At that time he gave his address as The Pembridge Garden Hotel, Nottinghill Gate, England. His mother Elizabeth was listed as next of kin, living at 1818 Robson St., Vancouver, B.C. John listed his occupation as an accountant. His medical examination resulted in a classification of C3—“fit for sedentary service in England only.” Cambie’s medical history suggested heart problems, with a rapid heart rate at rest, and shortness of breath on exertion. Eyesight was also a problem and he required glasses to see properly. He was assigned to the Canadian Forestry Corps. Cambie was transferred to the CAPC—Canadian Army Pay Corps. He received a series of promotions in 1917, from Corporal, to Sergeant, and on to Acting Staff Sergeant by April of 1918. S.Sgt. Cambie returned to Canada upon the Empress of Britain. He was demobilized in Ottawa on August 15th, 1919. John appears to have lived in Vancouver at his family home on Robson St. after the war, and was employed by the Canadian Bank of Commerce as a bank clerk until 1938. John Warner Cambie died in Vancouver of advanced pulmonary tuberculosis on May 5th, 1956. He never married. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Cambrey, James Henry (Corporal)

Service Number: 430716. James Henry Cambrey was born on August 5, 1883 in Dudley, England to Jabez Cambrey and Emily Darby. On October 3, 1907 he married Sarah Ann Miles in Fernie, B.C. They moved to Saanich in 1910. James signed his Attestation Papers in Victoria on March 18, 1915. His occupation was listed as miner. He served overseas with the 48th Battalion three years and ten months. Most of this service was with the Canadian Military Police in England and France, including six months as a warden in Wandsworth Detention Barracks. He was discharged from France in April 1919 with the rank of Corporal of the Military Police. He rejoined the Military Police at Victoria on April 8, 1919 and served at the Chinese repatriation camp at William Head. In 1920, James applied for the advertised position of Constable with the Saanich Police Department, for which he was not ultimately selected. At that time, he, his wife, and their four children were still living in their home at 3881 Savannah Avenue. James’ wife Sarah was one of the Canadians who went on the Vimy Ridge pilgrimage during the summer of 1936. She died in Winnipeg, Manitoba on October 23rd of that year, leaving behind her husband, three sons, daughter, mother and siblings. James later married Dorothy May Ogir, who died in 1957. Until his retirement, James worked for the Victoria School Board. At the time of his death, he lived at 1185 Reynolds Road. James Henry Cambrey died at the Veterans’ Hospital on February 27, 1961 at the age of 77. He is buried at Colwood Burial Park. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives. Attestation Papers

Cameron, Kenneth McLeod (Private)

Killed in Action 22 May 1915. Service Number: 28599. Kenneth McLeod Cameron, son of Mr.  & Mrs. F.S. Cameron, was born in Moose Jaw on 24 June 1894. The family moved to Saanich 1904 and Kenneth attended Royal Oak School. He enlisted with the 50th Gordon Highlanders in August 1914 and was later transferred to the 16th Battalion. Colonist - Jul 18, 1915, p.7 - (Photo) Having been informed that his son, Pte Kenneth McLeod Cameron, 50th Gordon Highlanders, 1st Contingent, transferred to 16th Battalion, has been MIA since Jun 5, his father, Samuel Cameron, foreman of the rifle range and resident of Saanich, is looking for particulars...; Sep 10, 5 - see letter from Scott... Cameron, 16th Overseas Battalion, CEF, s/o Mr. & Mrs. F S Cameron, aged 18, n/o Moose Jaw, SK, but lived here since 1904, receiving his education at Royal Oak school.  He enlisted in 50th Gordon Highlanders, Aug 1914. Kenneth McLeod Cameron is commemorated at the Vimy Memorial, on the Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial, and on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: L. Taylor and J. Clements. In September 2015, a group visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including the Vimy Memorial. Photographs courtesy of Gavin Cooper.  Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves | Canadian Cemetery No. 2 at Vimy | Canadian Grave Marker | Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial

Campbell, George (Private)

Service Number: 430845. George Campbell was born in Torrance, Lanark, Scotland on April 24th, 1895, according to his attestation papers, or April 2nd, 1898, according to his death registration, to parents George Campbell and Hannah (nee Woodhouse). He joined the CEF on March 31st, 1915 in Victoria and listed previous military experience with the 88th Victoria Fusiliers. His father George was listed as next of kin, living on Maplewood Rd., Orchardville, Maywood P.O. George stated his trade was piano tuner. Pte. Campbell arrived in England on July 10th, 1915, and then in France on June 18th. Military discipline appears to have been a problem for Sapper Campbell as shown in his military records: September /15, forfeits 16 day’s pay for being AWL, then a further forfeiture of 18 day’s pay in October. In January of 1916, he was sentenced to 28 days Field Prison #2 plus 16 days forfeiture of pay. This pattern continued: March/16, 28 days Field Prison #2 plus 14 days forfeiture of pay for AWL. At the end of August of 1916, Campbell was transferred to the 3rd Battalion, Canadian Pioneers. He had multiple hospital admissions due to tonsillitis, German measles, and impetigo, to mention a few. On August 3rd, 1918, George severely sprained his ankle. In his records it is written, “Sapper Campbell was playing baseball on the night of the 30th of August. While running to catch the ball, he fell in a shell hole and sprained his ankle. This is a pure accident.” Self- inflicted injuries were considered a serious matter in the army. There is also a letter on file from another Sapper who witnessed the accident, stating also that the injury was truly accidental. George was demobilized on February 28th, 1919. Then, on December 8th, 1921, he enlisted with the Permanent Forces and was assigned as a chauffeur with B. Company, PPCLI. He was “discharged by purchase” on April 16th, 1923 in Esquimalt. George Campbell married Hilda Walters at St. Michaels Vicary, Strawberry Vale on July 15th, 1924. George and Hilda settled in the Dunsterville area of Saanich. George is listed as a seaman in the 1925 directory, longshoreman in 1930, and in 1940, Atdt.- Provincial Mental Home. Sapper George Campbell died at Memorial Pavilion (formerly known as the Veterans Hospital), on December 31st, 1977. He is buried at the Veterans Cemetery in Esquimalt. His wife Hilda survived to the ripe old age of 101. George Campbell is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. References: B.C. Archives, Wrigley’s B.C. Directories, B.C. and Yukon directories. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Campbell, James (Private)

Killed in Action 24 September 1916. Service Number: 430085. James Campbell was born in Campbelton, Argyle, Scotland to parents Colin Campbell and Mary (nee McMillen) on June 17th, 1893. In the 1914 Henderson’s City Directory, James is residing at the house of Angus Campbell on Davida St., near Tillicum Rd. in Saanich. On March 1st, 1915, James signed his attestation papers in Victoria and was assigned to the 48th Battalion, CEF. His father Colin was listed as next of kin residing at The Cottage, Machrihamish, Argylesire, Scotland. James listed his occupation as a labourer. Pte. Campbell embarked for England upon the RMS Grampion on July 1st, 1915. Upon arrival in England he promptly went AWOL, and was given 4 days in Field Prison #2 and forfeited 3 day’s pay. Campbell was sent to France on September 10th, 1915 and transferred the next day to the 31st Battalion. In November of that year James was sentenced to a further 14 days FP #2 for absence from the 5:30 Field Parade. Pte. James Campbell was reported Killed in Action between Sept 24th-30th, 1916. He is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial and the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers | Canadian Virtual War Memorial | Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Campbell, James Hamilton (Private)

Service Number: 180996. J.H. Campbell was one of the soldiers who took advantage of the Saanich Soldiers Housing Scheme. He lived at 1071 Tattersall Drive (1049 Blenkinsop). His home was part of the first phase of the program (14 houses), headed by architect Major Karl Branwhite Spurgin. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives. James Hamilton Campbell was born in Victoria, B.C. on December 30th, 1894, to parents William Campbell and Catherine (nee Hamilton). On January 11th, 1916 James enlisted in the CEF in Victoria. James stated he was employed as a stationary engineer for Saanich municipality. His father William is listed as his next of kin, living at Elk Lake P.O., Victoria. He initially was assigned to the 88th Battalion, CEF, but was later transferred to the 47th Battalion. Pte. Campbell arrived in France from England on August 21st, 1916. On October 16th of that year, James received a gunshot wound to his left arm. He was treated first at the St. John Ambulance Station in Etapes, before being evacuated for further treatment in England at which point shell shock was added to his diagnosis. While being treated in the 2nd Southern General Hospital in Bristol, medical records show him being “stiff all over” December 2th, and the doctors queried a minor spinal injury. By December 13th, he had a diagnosis of Spastic Paraplegia, from which he gradually recovered. James was discharged from hospital in March of 1917. He was classified as Category A III, and assigned to the Canadian Forestry Corps. Pte. Campbell returned to Canada on board the Belgic in March of 1919 and received his discharge from the CEF on April 3rd, 1919. On October 29th of the same year, James married Florence Gertrude Angell at the “Paisley Church”, 1185 Fort Street, Victoria. They had at least one child, William Ronald Campbell on July 25th, 1922. Ronald was listed as “presumed dead” August 1st, 1944 while serving with the RCAF in Europe. The 1920 Henderson’s Directory shows James working as a truck driver for Saanich municipality, and living at 1049 Blenkinsop Rd. Florence died in Vancouver on October 1st, 1970. Their place of residence at that time was given as 1030 W. 14th Avenue, Vancouver. After that point, no records for James Hamilton Campbell have been found. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. References: B.C. Archives, Henderson’s Directory, FamilySearch.org. Information submitted by: V. Minaker. Attestation Papers

Campbell, John (Sergeant)

Service Number: 524510. John Campbell was born on June 24, 1891 in Lambhill, Lanarkshire, Scotland to Angus Campbell and Margaret (Maggie) Ramsay. On his 1915 Attestation Papers, John listed his mother as his next of kin, living at Davida Avenue, Tillicum Post Office. His profession at the time was gardener. He married Mary Brawn, date undetermined. John Campbell was widowed when he died on May 9, 1967 at the Glenwarren Private Hospital in Victoria. His permanent residence had been 3735 Savannah Avenue in Saanich. Information submitted by: J. Clements.  Attestation Papers

Campbell, Robert

Service Number: 2139920. Robert Campbell was born on October 28, 1890 (or 1889 as listed in the 1911 census) in Campbeltown, Argyleshire, Scotland. At the time of enlistment in 1917, he lived at Turgoose (Central Saanich) and was a farmer. His brother Hector Campbell, named as his next of kin, lived on Broughton Street in Victoria. Robert Campbell was discharged on January 9, 1919. Information submitted by: J. Clements.  Attestation Papers

Campbell, Thomas (Private)

Service Number: 629926. Thomas Campbell was born in Glasgow, Scotland on May 16th, 1885 to parents Thomas Campbell and Agnes (nee Tait). On November 5th, 1915, Thomas enlisted in the CEF at New Westminster, B.C. He gave his mother Agnes Campbell as his next of kin, residing at 4506 Inverness St., South Vancouver. Thomas stated he was an electrician. In France by August of 1916, Pte. Campbell was on water detail with the 47th Battalion. He was then transferred to the CAMC Sanitary Section where he remained for the next 3 years and 11 months. Thomas was promoted to Corporal on September 8th, 1917. Corporal Campbell was granted leave to England (10-14) days in 1917,’18, and ’19. In November of 1918, he was also granted permission to marry and did so. His bride Georgina Palmer Hood was living at 113 Rodenhurst Road, Clapham Park, London SW4. After their marriage, Georgina began receiving a $15/month separation allowance. Campbell was discharged from the CEF on September 3rd, 1919 in Quebec, and returned to Vancouver, B.C. Upon his retirement in the ‘40s, he and Georgina moved to Saanich, living at 838 Agnes St. Thomas Campbell died on June 26th, 1960 at Veteran’s Hospital. His occupation was still listed as electrician. He is buried in the Royal Oak Burial Park. Thomas Campbell is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker.  Attestation Papers

Campion, Samuel

Service Number: 430454. Samuel Campion, son of Samuel and Elizabeth (nee Goode) Campion, was born in England on April 15, 1876 and enlisted with the Canadian Expeditionary Force in 1915.  His attestation papers list his occupation as labourer and his next of kin as Mrs. Campion of the Marigold area of Saanich. He was married to Florence Maude (nee Duffield) Campion.  He died in Victoria on August 04, 1948 at age 72. Information submitted by: Julie Clements. Samuel Campion was one of the soldiers who took advantage of the Saanich Soldiers Housing Scheme. He lived at 987 Darwin Road. His home was part of the first phase of the program (14 houses), headed by architect Major Karl Branwhite Spurgin. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives.  Attestation Papers

Cardwell, Joseph (Private)

Killed in Action 4 February 1917. Service Number: 180596. Joseph Cardwell was born in Ballynakelly, Tyronne, Ireland, on June 5th, 1881. At the time of his enlistment in the CEF, he and his wife Margaret were living on Lake Rd., Saanich, Maywood P.O. On November 8th, 1915 Joseph signed his attestation papers in Victoria. He stated he worked as a labourer and his previous military experience was 1 ½ years with the Imperial Yeomanry in South Africa, and 8 months with the 50th Gordon Highlanders in Canada. Pte. Cardwell sailed from Halifax to England on May 31st, 1916, and in July of that year was transferred to the 30th Battalion. Joseph arrived in France on August 26th, 1916 and joined his unit in the field on August 9th. His hand-written will dated September 14th, 1916 leaving all his possessions to his wife is part of his military records. Pte Joseph Cardwell was reported Killed in Action on February 4th, 1917. The $20/month separation allowance to his wife was canceled at this point, and on February 5th, 1917, she was granted a widow’s pension. Pte. Cardwell is buried at the Villiers Station Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France. Margaret Cardwell moved to Los Angeles, California after Joseph’s death and his medals were sent to her there. Joseph Cardwell is commemorated on the Canadian Virtual War Memorial and the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Minaker. In September 2015, a group visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including the Villiers Station Cemetery. Photographs courtesy of Gavin Cooper.  Attestation Papers | Canadian Virtual War Memorial | Commonwealth War Graves| Grave

Carrier, Bernard (Private)

Service Number: 180851. Bernard Carrier was born in Wiltstead, Bedfordshire, England on October 1st, 1878 to parents Joseph and Georgina Carrier. Census records suggest that he arrived in Canada with his wife and children in 1903 (LAC 1911 census). His parents also immigrated to Canada and settled on Keating Cross Road. Bernard signed his attestation papers on December 29th, 1915 in Victoria. At that time he was working as a stone cutter, married to Edith Mary Carrier and living at 2574 Florence St. Victoria. The 1911 Canadian census shows the family living in Vancouver. During his overseas service, wife Edith received a separation allowance of $20/month. Pte. Carrier was first assigned to the 88th Victoria Fusiliers, and later transferred to the 1st Pioneer C.E. Battalion. He arrived in Liverpool, England on board the S.S. Olympic on June 8th 1916, and on August 27th 1916 embarked for France. Bernard was briefly treated by the 46th Field Ambulance on July 15th 1917 after being gassed. His exposure left him with no long term health effects, and he returned to the field the next day. Ten days leave was granted in October of 1917, and fourteen days leave in October of 1918. He was promoted to Lance Corporal in July of 1918. L.Cpl. Carrier returned to Canada on board the Empress of Britain and was discharged from the CEF on March 22nd, 1919 in Vancouver, B.C. From there he returned to his Florence St. home. In the 1930 American Census, Bernard is listed as living in Tacoma, Washington along with his wife and children Dennis Hugh, George Louis, and Emily Regina. Their immigration year to the US is listed as 1926. Bernard’s sister, Georgina, is also found in the B.C. Archives records with her marrying in Victoria in 1909 to James Hamilton Johnston. Bernard Carrier died on September 21st, 1950. He was living at 7882 Prince Albert St., Vancouver at the time of his death. He had continued to work as a stone cutter until 1945 in various locations. He is buried in Mt. View cemetery in Vancouver. Bernard Carrier is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. References: L.A.C., Familysearch.org, B.C. Archives, Henderson’s Directory Victoria. Information submitted by: V. Minaker and M. Green.  Attestation Papers

Carrier, Reginald (Driver)

Service Number: 313860. Reginald Carrier, known as Jim, was born in Bedford, England on July 19th, 1882 to parents Joseph Carrier and Georgina (nee Green). He immigrated to Canada around 1902 and at the time of his attestation was living in the Royal Oak district of Saanich working as a surveyor’s assistant. Reginald signed his attestation papers on January 21st, 1916, listing his mother Georgina as next of kin. Joseph and Georgina had also immigrated to Canada and were living in the Royal Oak district of Saanich. His brother Bernard had enlisted the previous month. Carrier stated he had served previously with the South African Light Horses. Pte. Carrier was initially assigned to the 38th Battery-Canadian Field Artillery, then transferred to the Alberta Regimental Depot, and then to the 1st Brigade C.F.A. as a bomb carrier until his discharge. Reginald was hospitalized with bronchitis for two months after contracting a severe cold in October of 1916. Then while “on the line of march” in February of 1917, he sustained a severe fracture of his right wrist/forearm and was hospitalized in London for three months. In June of 1917, Pte. Carrier was promoted to the rank of Sergeant/bombardier. He was granted permission to marry in May of 1918 and by July, his separation allowance was transferred from his mother in Canada, to his wife Evelyn May Carrier (nee Charman), Yew Tree Cottage, Crawleigh, Surrey, England. He returned to Canada in January of 1919 and was discharged from the CEF on February 19th, 1919 in Vancouver. Reginald and new wife Evelyn returned to Vancouver Island and in the 1921 census were living in the Keating district of Saanich with their 2 month old daughter Joyce. Reginald was employed at that time as a bookkeeper for the Cement Works. Reginald Carrier died on November 26th, 1956 at the Royal Jubilee Hospital. He was then living in Brentwood Bay (Tod Inlet) and his given profession was postmaster. The death registration papers were signed by D.W. Carrier, his son. Reginald Carrier is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. References: Library and Archives Canada, B.C. Archives, Familysearch.org.  Information submitted by: V. Minaker and M. Green.  Attestation Papers

Carrington Pte J.

Carruthers Sgt. I.

Case, John Monckton or Monckton Case, John (Lieutenant)

Died 9 November 1917. Born 30 Oct 1878 in Warwick, England. Attended Tonbridge School in Tonbridge, Kent, England from 1889-1891, (see biography on school website). Came to Canada in 1908 and settled in Kelowna and then Saanich. Interested in fruit growing. Served with the Canadian Engineers, Regimental Depot. Died at Sandwich Military Hospital, Kent on November 9th, 1917. Buried at ST. MARGARET'S-AT-CLIFFE (ST. MARGARET) CHURCHYARD. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives.  Attestation Papers  | Commonwealth War Graves Commission  

Castle Pioneer T.G.

Cecil, Albert

Albert Cecil was one of the soldiers who took advantage of the Saanich Soldiers Housing Scheme. He lived at 1951 Woodley Road. His home was part of the first phase of the program (14 houses), headed by architect Major Karl Branwhite Spurgin. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives.

Chamberlain Lce Cpl E.

Chandler, Roy Dunsterville (Private)

Service Number: 16870. Roy Dunsterville Chandler was born in Victoria on October 29, 1885 (1893 on Attestation Papers) to John Forsythe Chandler and Lizzie Denham Chandler. At the time of his enlistment in 1914, he lived in Colquitz (Wilkinson Road). His trade was listed as fruit grower. Roy married Marguerite Winnifred Brooke Bennett at St. Columba's Church in Strawberry Vale on September 20, 1921. He and his wife lived at 19 Eaton Avenue in View Royal during their later years. Roy died at the Memorial Pavilion in Saanich on May 2, 1980 at the age of 94. He was predeceased by Marguerite, who died in 1976. Information submitted by: J. Clements. Photograph and Recollections generously shared by L. Baur, daughter.   Attestation Papers | Photograph | Recollections [PDF - 7.5 MB]

Cleator, John Richard (Regimental Sergeant Major)

Service Number: 431117. John Richard Cleator was born on May 29, 1892 in Whitehaven, Cumberland, England to Thomas Henry Cleator and Isabella Jouhin. He enlisted on June 4, 1914 in Victoria. At the time, his parents were living at 1571 Edgeware Road. His occupation was listed as clerk on his Attestation Papers. He left Victoria with the 48th Battalion in 1915 and had previously spent four months with the 50th Gordon Highlanders. The Colonist newspaper of May 31, 1916 reported that he had been wounded by shrapnel. John’s brother Josiah, with whom John had a plumbing partnership, served with the 103rd Battalion (Killed in Action). John married Hilda Kate Goldsworthy in England in 1917, and they had a son, John Sutherland Cleator, in November 1919. In 1920, John Sr. applied for the advertised position of Constable with the Saanich Police Department, for which he was not ultimately selected. At that time, he was living on Broadmead Avenue near Shelbourne Street. He retired from his position as a clerk for the government in 1955. John and his wife were living at 3025 Dean at this time. Hilda died on June 26, 1956 and John later married Jane Helen Murray (approx. 1959). John Richard Cleator died on February 6, 1964 in his home at 749 Claremont Avenue. He had been in Saanich for 50 years. Information submitted by: J. Clements and Saanich Archives.  Attestation Papers | Daily Colonist, May 31, 1916 (p. 5)

Cleeves, Alfred (Lieutenant)

Service Number: 83003. Died 21 May 1919 in Saanich. Alfred Cleeves was born 2 June 1890 in Rotherham, England to Frederick Cleeves, a Master of the Worshipful Company of Pattenmakers in London, and Mary Ann Cleeves (nee Birks). He enlisted with the Canadian Expeditionary Force in Toronto on 15 Dec 1914 and served with the 4th Brigade Canadian Field Artillery. Alfred Cleeves married Janet Olave Story in England in Sep 1916. He was discharged at the end of the war and arrived in Saanich with his wife early in 1919 to settle on the land left to him by his brother Vincent (killed in action in France in 1915 - see biography below). He died of illness in Saanich a few months later after just completing a cottage for himself and his wife. He is buried at the nearby cemetery of Our Lady of the Assumption Church on West Saanich Road. The south half of this cemetery is First Nations while the north portion appears to be associated with the local Catholic parish. Cleeves’s gravestone is a hybrid marker that consists of two parts: (1) A marble cross (labeled R.I.P, about 4 feet high) which sits atop a marble double dias with engraved details, which, in turn, sits on a marble panel (roughly 1 ½ by 2 feet, 4 inches high). The panel sits atop an exposed aggregate pad about 10 feet x 5 feet that is surrounded by a marble curb. (2) A standard military marker (grey marble) is embedded in the exposed aggregate pad, lying horizontally. It contains a carved maple leaf, a carved cross and personal details of Lieutenant Cleeves. The marker sits beneath a lovely mature, double-trunked fir tree. It sits between a number of graves with the name “Butler”. Alfred Cleeves is commemorated on the Worshipful Company of Pattenmakers Roll of Honour in England. Information submitted by Steve Huxham, Julie Clements, and DPIC. Attestation Papers | Service File | Commonwealth War Graves Commission | Grave Photographs [PDF - 1.5 MB]

Cleeves, Vincent (Private)

Killed in Action 24 April 1915. Service Number: 16872. 7th Battalion (1st British Columbia Regiment). Born in Rotherham, England on 23 January 1879, Vincent Cleeves was the son of Frederick Cleeves, a Master of the Worshipful Company of Pattenmakers in London, and Mary Ann Cleeves (nee Birks). After serving in the South African War, Vincent Cleeves returned to England before moving to Canada in 1907 and purchasing a small farm in the Mount Newton area of Saanich. He appears in the 1911 Canadian Census as a single man of 32 living in Saanich and working as a fruit grower. At the outbreak of war, Vincent Cleeves enlisted with the CEF at Valcartier, Quebec on 23 September 1914. He served with the 7th Battalion and was killed in action on 24th April 1915. He is buried in Poelcapelle British Cemetery, ten kilometres north-east of Ypres. Vincent’s farm in Saanich was inherited by his brother Alfred (see biography of Alfred Cleeves above). Vincent is mentioned in the January 1, 1917 edition of the Cambria Daily Leader in an article on the Sketty Shrines: "On Sunday, at Sketty, there was a splendid muster of the "D" Company Volunteers, V.A.D., Red Cross nurses and C.L.B. for church parade. The service was conducted by the Chaplain (Rev. J. H. Stewart). After the service the Vicar dedicated the 5th Sketty shrine (corner of De la Beche and Gower roads). This shrine had been erected in memory of relatives and friends of parishioners, and bore the following inscription: -"Remember before God the following who have died in the service of their King and country: Albert Chapple, Ernest R. Elston, Alexander D. Glasgodine, Vincent Cleeves, George B. Hawken, Harry Robinson, Alfred Shackleford and Heward Wake. Pray for the safety of -" [followed by names of 59 of those serving]. The other shrines are being kept spotlessly clean, and the frequent renewal of floral decorations testifies to the appreciation of those at home of the sacrifices of the local lads on their behalf." Vincent Cleeves is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll, the Roll of Honour at St Stephen’s Anglican Church in Saanichton, the Worshipful Company of Pattenmakers Roll of Honour in England, and the 5th Sketty shrine in Wales. Information submitted by Steve Huxham and B. Baynham with additional information provided by Saanich Archives. In September 2015, a group visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including Poelcapelle British Cemetery. Photographs courtesy of Gavin Cooper.  Attestation Papers | Service File | Commonwealth War Graves Commission | Bio by the Worshipful Company of Pattenmakers [PDF - 2.9 MB] | Poelcapelle British Cemetery 1 | Poelcapelle British Cemetery 2 | Grave

Chevalley Pte F.

Clough Paul (Private)

Service Number: 524514. Paul Clough was born on March 15, 1874 in Liverton, Devon, England to James C. Clough and Sedonia Tobisch. He served in the South African War as part of the 1st Canadian South African Contingent (2nd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment). He married Nancy M. Earle on May 2, 1903 in Toronto, Ontario. In the 1912 Victoria directory, Paul and his wife are listed at 2708 Cecil. By 1914, they were living at 2933 Albina near Gorge Road in Saanich. The directory entries from this time period indicate that Paul was a carpenter, though he refers to himself as an electrical engineer on his Attestation Papers. Paul enlisted on August 27, 1915 at the age of 41 in Vernon, BC. He is included in the 1918 Saanich Voters List and city directory. He died January 31st, 1947. At the time of his death he was living on Drinkwater Rd. in Somenos (Cowichan area) with wife Nancy. He was an engineer and farmer. Paul Clough is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: P. Nicholson, age 7.  Attestation Papers

Coates Pte

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Cobb Bandmaster D.

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Coles Bugler A.

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Coles Pte A.E.

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Coles Sapper J.

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Coles Bugler S.

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Collins Pte Harry A.

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Colton, Alf. W. (Sergeant)

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Colton Pte W.

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Costello Pte R.J.

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Coton Pte Alfred J.

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Coton Sgt H.D.

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Court Pte W.

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Cousins Pte W.J.

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Coverdale Driver L.A.

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Coverdale Driver R.W.

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Coverdale Pte Wilbur

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Crabtree Pte

Crabtree Pte

Crabtree Sgt Mjr Levi

Cruse, Charles Camige

Killed in Action. Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student.

Daniel, Joseph

Service Number: 826258. Joseph Daniel lived at 911 Dunn Avenue in the Maywood district of Saanich. He signed up for active duty in 1916 but lied about his age - he was actually 46 years of age when he joined. He served overseas with the Bantams. Sources: Sidney Allinson, The Bantams. Information submitted by: L. Larose (granddaughter).  Attestation papers

Darnell, Pte Philip B.

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Davies, David William (1st Lieutenant)

Service Number (UK): 188844. David (Bill) William Davies was born on May 10, 1893 in Victoria and lived in the area for most of his life except for his overseas service during the war. He resided on McBriar Avenue in Saanich as the family owned three houses and five lots on McBriar Avenue and Ambassador Road. At the time of his enlistment, Canada had not yet joined the war; Bill flew to England and enlisted in the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) where he went on to fly his bi-plane throughout the war. He was shot down three times and made it back to allied territory each time. Bill was mentioned in dispatches and was presented with a medal, possibly from the King of Belgium. Throughout the war, he carried a Kodak 1/2 frame camera with him. Bill returned to Saanich after the war with no injuries. He married Edna Castle on December 5, 1923. During the Second World War, he was made the Air Raid Patrol Warden for the Lake Hill District as he was too old to fight.  David William Davies died on October 24, 1957 in Esquimalt at the age of 64. Information submitted by: M. & D. Davies.

Dawkins Pte D.

Research in progress by: L. Stanley.

Dawkins, Owen Victor

Research in progress by: L. Stanley.

Dawson, Charles Frederick (Sergeant Major)

Service Number: 77919. Fred Dawson was born in Birmingham, England to Charles Gill and Emma (nee Saunders) Dawson. He married Irene Alice Laing on March 20, 1911 and enlisted with the CEF in 1915. Fred Dawson died on April 24, 1972 at age 87 at the Veteran’s Hospital in Saanich and is buried at St. Luke's Churchyard Cemetery, Saanich, BC. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives.  Attestation Papers | Photo

Dawson Bandmaster E.F.

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Dean, Arnold (Private)

Killed in Action 28 October 1917. Service Number: 706455. Arnold Dean is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. In June 2016, Military Researcher Steve Clifford visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including the Nine Elms British Cemetery in Belgium. Photographs courtesy of Steve Clifford.  Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves Commission | Canadian Virtual War MemorialNine Elms British Cemetery | Grave

Dempster, John

Research in progress by: Minaker family

Dempster, Thomas Borland

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Depew Pte John Jr.

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Depew Pte John Sr.

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Dewar, Lieut James A.

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Dobbie, Thomas

Killed in Action 9 April 1917, age 18. Service Number: 706961. Son of Mr. Alec Dobbie, of Clydebank, Glasgow, Scotland. Husband of Beatrice Green Dobbie of 866 Brett Avenue, Saanich. Commemorated at GIVENCHY ROAD CANADIAN CEMETERY, NEUVILLE-ST. VAAST. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives.  Attestation Papers| Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Donald Pte Alex F.

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Downey, John Thomas

Service Number: 1048909. John Thomas Downey, the son of farmer John James and Margaret Downey, was born in Saanich on May 9, 1867. He married Nellie Kelsey on October 5, 1910 in Cranbrook. He died in Kamloops on November 19, 1946 at age 79. Information submitted by: Julie Clements.  Attestation Papers

Doyle, Moses (Private)

Service Number: 400416. Moses Doyle was born on May 21, 1875 in County Kildare, Ireland. He married Marguerite (Margaret) Duncan at St. Paul's Manse in Victoria on February 3, 1911. His residence at the time was in Esquimalt. He and his wife later moved to 3436 Bethune Avenue in Saanich, their address when he enlisted in Vernon BC in 1915. Moses was discharged from service in 1918 for being "medically unfit". He returned to the Victoria area but later moved with his wife to Port Angeles, Washington where they would remain. Margaret died in 1945 and Moses died in 1950. They are both buried in Mount Angeles Memorial Park in Port Angeles. Information submitted by: J. Clements and Saanich Archives.  Attestation Papers

Duffield Pte Archibald

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Duffield Pte James

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Duke Lieut L.

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Eccleston, Charles

Service Number: 107207. Charles Eccleston was born on February 14, 1880 or 1882 in Westleton near Oswestry, Shropshire, England to Andrew Eccleston and Elizabeth Edwards. He enlisted on November 14, 1916 in Victoria. His occupation at the time was fireman. On July 22, 1919 Charles married a widow, Joan (nee McPhee) Taylor in Victoria. Charles was one of the soldiers who took advantage of the Saanich Soldiers Housing Scheme. He lived at 765 Beaver Lake Road. His home was part of the second phase of the program (5 houses), headed by architect Ralph Berrill. Charles retired from his position as a fire chief in 1933. He died on April 5, 1960 at the Veterans’ Hospital in Saanich. At the time of his death, his address was listed as 2355 Richmond Avenue. Charles Eccleston is buried in Royal Oak Burial Park. Information submitted by: J. Clements and Saanich Archives.  Attestation Papers

Eden, George Stanley

George Stanley Eden was one of the soldiers who took advantage of the Saanich Soldiers Housing Scheme. He lived at 3115 Wascana Street. His home was part of the second phase of the program (5 houses), headed by architect Ralph Berrill. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives.

Edwards Pte J.B.

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Emsley Bugler Albert

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Etheridge Pte Reg

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Farmer Pte H.A.

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Fetherston, Stanley Douglas (Gunner)

Service Number: 476537. Stanley Douglas Fetherston was born on April 5 1899 in Glasgow, Scotland to Samuel George Fetherston and Janet Wilson Smith. His Attestation Papers indicate that he was age 16 at the time of enlistment and lived on Cedar Hill Road, Mt Tolmie. He responded Yes to the question of being married, but marriage records indicate that he married Agnes Simpson on September 4 1918. His marriage certificate lists his age as 21. At the time of his marriage, the Henderson’s City Directory lists the family home address as 1650 Hollywood Crescent. The 1921 Henderson’s City directory lists Stanley's address as 2511 Blanshard. Following the war, he was employed in the Lands Dept., Provincial Government. Stanley died in an airplane accident on February 11 1925 in Texas at the age of 26. He had been interested in eventually establishing an air service between Victoria and Port Angeles. Stanley Douglas Fetherston (spelled "Featherston") is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: J. Aten.  Attestation Papers | Colonist 13 February 1925 (p. 5) | See also "WWI - References in Gordon Head Athletic Club Minutes 1916-1919"

Fieldhouse, Frederick Robert

Service Number: 186326. Frederick Robert Fieldhouse was born in Ordsall, Lancashire, England on October 31st, 1891. He married Edith Ellen Lees in Victoria B.C. on November 22nd, 1919. Frederick and Edith had two daughters: Olive (now deceased) and Edna who is now 84 years old (2014) and lives in Penticton B.C. The family lived in Vancouver and Penticton. Frederick died on June 10th, 1981 in Penticton B.C. Information submitted by: Jim Askey, great-nephew. F.R. Fieldhouse was one of the soldiers who took advantage of the Saanich Soldiers Housing Scheme, purchasing a new house on Kent Road (615 or 623). His home was part of the first phase of the program (14 houses), headed by architect Major Karl Branwhite Spurgin. Frederick’s brother, Edward Fieldhouse, lived next door with his wife at 617 Kent Road. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives.  Attestation Papers

Foster Bugler Alan

Foster, Kenneth (Private, Gunner)

Kenneth Walter Foster was born to Walter and Alice Foster in England on 11 May 1898. The family came to Canada in 1906 and settled in Saanich, living first at Portage Inlet and later on Hastings Street. Kenneth Foster was 16 when the First World War began in August of 1914 and the following year he was still under-age when he enlisted and was assigned to the 50th Gordon Highlanders. In September 1915 Private Foster left British Columbia for England with the 62nd Battalion. After training in England he was sent to France as a gunner and was wounded in the Battle of the Somme. He spent several months recovering from his injury at a hospital in Cheshire, England before returning to the battlefield. He was recommended for the Military Medal for bravery during the battle for Hill 70 near the French city of Lens.  At the end of the war Private Kenneth Foster received a discharge and returned to Saanich where he married Jessie Thorpe. The couple built a home on Pipeline Road and had two children, Barbara and Daryl. Kenneth’s health suffered greatly from his war injuries and he died in 1947 when he was just 49 years old. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: Daryl Foster and Barbara Hourston.  Find out more about Kenneth Walter Foster | Read related article in the Saanich News | CEF Pay Book [PDF - 719 KB]

Foster, Philip (Private)

Service Number: 826156. Pte. Phillip James Rennie Foster was born to Walter and Alice Foster in Thornton Heath in England on May 31, 1900. The family came to Canada in 1906 and eventually settled in Saanich, living first at Portage Inlet and later on Hastings Street. Philip Foster was 14 when the First World War began in August of 1914 and he was still under-age when he enlisted on Feb. 25, 1916 joining the 143rd Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force. He made himself 2 years older by stating his birthdate as Jan. 31, 1898. At the end of the war, Philip James Foster received a discharge and returned to Saanich. Phil worked with cars for most of his life. He built and drove racing cars when there was a track at Willows and later at Langford. He operated an (auto) service station, Phil Foster’s Speedway Service, at the corner of Douglas and Queens Avenue for much of his working life. He collected and restored antique cars for many years. The 1912 Model T Ford named Elizabeth that is now on display at the Victoria museum was one of his. He married Elizabeth Scroggie in 1940. The couple built a home on Murray Drive and lived there until his death on July 3, 1970. They did not have children. Philip Foster is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: Daryl Foster.  Attestation Papers | Information on the 143rd (B.C. Bantams) Battalion [PDF - 98 KB] | Alan Foster (brother of Philip Foster) oral history transcript [PDF - 631 KB] | Find out more about Philip James Rennie Foster [PDF - 749 KB].

Fowler Gunner E.V.

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Frampton E

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Franck Pte Albert

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Franck Pte George

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Franck Pte James

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Franck Pte Joseph

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Franck Pte Thomas

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Franck Pte Victor

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Freeland Sapper Frank

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Fromson, Eli

Service Number: 2771401. Eli Fromson was born on September 28, 1883 in Manchester, England. He came to Montreal in approximately 1906, and then to the Victoria area in about 1910. At the time of his enlistment on December 15, 1917, he was already married to Jane Fromson (nee Cohen). They lived on Pear Street near Cedar Hill Road in the Mount Tolmie area of Saanich. Eli was a carpenter by trade. He was later Quartermaster-Sergeant in the Ordinance Corps at Signal Hill, and lived at 1450 Esquimalt Road. He died on June 21, 1934 at the Jubilee Hospital in Victoria, leaving his wife, 2 sons, and 2 brothers. Eli Fromson was an active member of Temple Emmanuel and is buried at the Jewish cemetery. Information submitted by: J. Clements.  Attestation Papers | Veteran Death Card

Fullerton Driver E.V.

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Fullerton, James Thornton

James Thornton Fullerton was born in 1891 in Phoenix Place, Victoria. His father was John Fullerton, who had been chief engineer on the S.S. Beaver. Later, John Fullerton was an importer of boots and shoes in Victoria. Fullerton attended South Park School. He also took music lessons from Miss R. Stoddard, and participated in a music recital at the studio on June 30 1902. Fullerton later attended the Victoria High School. A profile in The Daily Colonist gives an overview of Fullerton's career: "He entered the service of the Dominion Government at Rivers Inlet salmon hatchery, and in 1910 went to Prince George, later going to McGill to complete his education. He graduated with the degree of B.Sc. as a civil engineer, and prior to joining for active service he was in the service of the Dominion Land Survey Commission, his duties confining him to the railway belt between Vancouver and Hope." (The Daily Colonist May 23 1917). Around 1913, Fullerton's father retired to Gordon Head, Saanich and started strawberry farming. John Fullerton had a house built at Ferndale Road near Gordon Head Road (what is now "Lantern Lane.") The house later became the home of Nellie McClung. Fullerton (presumably when he was at home visiting his Dad) became a member of the Gordon Head Athletic Club. One of Fullerton's sisters was also a member. On January 5 1917, the Gordon Head Athletic Club held "a farewell dance for Mr. Fullerton." There were games, dancing and a supper, ending with patriotic speeches. According to the club minutes, the Club president, local fruit farmer W.T. Edwards "gave the message of the Club to Mr. Fullerton, wishing him much good fortune, great opportunities for service and a safe return. To all of which Mr. Fullerton appropriately replied. Everyone joined in singing 'For He's a Jolly Good Fellow' and wishing him godspeed." On January 11 1917, Fullerton left for the Royal Military College. By March 20 1917, he had returned to Greater Victoria. He had qualified for overseas service and was attached to the draft of the 6th Canadian Garrison Artillery at Willows Camp. On May 22 1917, Fullerton conducted a draft of artillery recruits to Camp Petawawa for summer training. Fullerton arrived in Britain on December 31 1917. He was stationed at Witley Camp, then proceeded to France in April 1918. Fullerton served in England and France with the No. 11 Draft, Canadian Overseas Artillery, 3rd Canadian Ammunition Column, 10th Brigade C.F.A. and Canadian Artillery Regimental Depot. Fullerton arrived back in Canada in April 1919. James Thornton Fullerton died January 17 1970 at Shaughnessy Military Hospital in Vancouver. Information submitted by: S.A. Warner. Sources: British Colonist Online; Canada's Historic Places; Digital war service records, Library and Archives Canada; Gordon Head Athletic Club minutes, Saanich Archives.  Attestation Papers

Gaiger Bandsman A.P.

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Galbraith Pte M.

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Gale Pte B.G.

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Gale Gunner William

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Gann Pte Herbert

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Garcin, Alpheus Domnic Rideout (Lieutenant)

Service Number: 521065. Alpheus Garcin was born on January 23, 1878 in Rose Blanche, Newfoundland. Alpheus' great grandfather was born in Paris, France and served as a Lieutenant on a French warship. When he retired from active service he was rated the richest man in St. Malo, France, but died a poor man. Alpheus' grandfather, Prosper Alex Garcin, was born in 1820 in St. Malo, France and was also a Lieutenant in the French Navy. He was awarded a medal for rescuing two French sailors. Prosper deserted his shipmates in Newfoundland and married a Newfoundland girl named Elizabeth Hooper. Prosper had a son named Prosper Alpheus Dominic Garcin who was born in St. Malo, France in 1840 and married Sarah Rideout in Rose Blanche, Newfoundland. They had ten children. Their eighth child was Alpheus Dominic Rideout Garcin, born on January 23, 1878. Alpheus was a general dealer in a store with his brothers, Prosper William and Thomas. Nine of the ten siblings moved with their parents to Victoria, BC. Alpheus married May Dobinson on July 1, 1915 in Victoria. May was born in Stockton, Durham, England in 1883. Alpheus and May lived on Obed Avenue in Saanich. Alpheus joined the Canadian Armed Forces on June 12, 1915. He began as a Private in WWI (Regimental #521065) in the Canadian Medical Corps and was presented with the Star Medal on December 31, 1917. As a Corporal in the Canadian Army Medical Corps he was presented with the British Medal and Victoria Medal on the same day. As a 2nd Lieutenant in the Army Service Corps he was presented with the British Medal and Victory Medal on September 30, 1925. After Alpheus moved from Newfoundland to Victoria, he started a General Store. He later worked on the S.S. Gray ship sailing from Victoria and arriving at Tacoma, Washington on September 20, 1933. He was a pumpman and was age 54. He was 5'7" tall and weighed 155 pounds. Alpheus Dominic Rideout Garcin died on January 1, 1955 in Victoria, BC. Alpheus' wife, May Garcin, died on May 25, 1958 in Victoria. Information submitted by: Jim Duval.  Attestation Papers | Daily Colonist 21 Jan 1919, p.11

Garnet Pte Wilfred

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Gearey Gunner Clarence G.

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Gibson Pte Wm. Jas.

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Gill Cpl C.A.

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Girling, Albert Henry Godfrey (Lce Cpl)

Albert Henry Godfrey Girling, known as Bert, was born on October 26, 1881 in Suffolk, England, and was the eldest son of George Godfrey Girling and Ellen Elizabeth Mills. He was trained as a carpenter in his father's business. He then became interested in mechanics and trained as a mechanical engineer. When his family immigrated to Saanich in about 1910, Albert remained in England. He joined the Army Service Corps in England in 1916, and was sent to France as an engineer in an aircraft station. Albert finished the War with the rank of Staff Sergeant. His friend Col. Thomas Order Lees tried to get him a commission and a transfer but this was in 1918 and the war ended. He served in the trenches and was wounded when a piece of shrapnel went through one side of his face and out of the other. Fortunately it did not do any lasting damage except for a scar. Albert is best known as the inventor of the Girling braking system. He died on December 19, 1971 in Ditchingham, Suffolk, England. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives. Sources: Saanich Archives Vertical Files; The Daily Colonist (Wed 25 Apr 1917, p.5), The Daily Colonist (Sun 4 Nov 1917, p.5), The Daily Colonist (Fri 11 Oct 1918, p.5). Photo

Girling, Godfrey (Private)

Killed in Action 10 January 1918. Service Number: 180620. Godfrey Girling, known as Teddy or Toff, was born on November 1, 1891 in Woolwich, England along with his twin brother, Stanley (see below). He immigrated to Saanich in about 1910 with his parents, George Godfrey Girling and Ellen Elizabeth Mills, and seven of his siblings. The family home and farm was located at 781 Ralph Street beside Swan Lake. Godfrey enlisted on November 15, 1915 at the age of 24. He and his brother Samuel (see below) joined the 88th Battalion, went overseas in 1916, and then served with the 3rd Canadian Pioneers. He also served with the 123rd Battalion. Godfrey was killed in action on January 10, 1918 at the age of 26 and is buried in Maroc British Cemetery, Grenay, France. Following his death, his Commanding Officer described him in a letter as "a very temperate - clean living chap - popular with his comrades, & it will be impossible for you to pay him too high a tribute." He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll and the 88th Battalion Nominal Roll. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives. Sources: Saanich Archives Vertical Files; The Daily Colonist(Wed 25 Apr 1917, p.5); The Daily Colonist (Sat 16 Feb 1918, p.2), The Daily Colonist  (Fri 11 Oct 1918, p.5). In September 2015, a group visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including the Maroc British Cemetery. Photographs courtesy of Gavin Cooper.  Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves Commission | Canadian Virtual War Memorial | Maroc British Cemetery | Grave | Photo

Girling, Leonard Sawyer (Gunner)

Leonard Sawyer Girling was born on November 11, 1888 in Woolwich, England. He immigrated to Saanich in about 1910 with his parents, George Godfrey Girling and Ellen Elizabeth Mills, and seven of his siblings. The family home and farm was located at 781 Ralph Street beside Swan Lake. Leonard and his brother Stanley (see below) joined the 5th Regiment, Canadian Garrison Artillery in 1914 and left Victoria with a draft of munition workers in 1915. In 1917, Leonard and Stanley were working in Royal Arsenal, Woolwich. After Stanley was wounded in the field, Leonard twice gave his blood for transfusion to his brother to save his life.  As a result of this action, Leonard died on October 9, 1918 at the age of 29 at Sidcup Hospital, Plumstead, England. He is buried at Woolwich Cemetery. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives. Sources: Saanich Archives Vertical Files; The Daily Colonist (Wed 25 Apr 1917, p.5), The Daily Colonist (Fri 11 Oct 1918, p.5). Photo

Girling, Samuel Mills (Private)

Service Number: 180621. Samuel Mills Girling, known as John, was born on October 22, 1895. He immigrated to Saanich in about 1910 with his parents, George Godfrey Girling and Ellen Elizabeth Mills, and seven of his siblings. The family home and farm was located at 781 Ralph Street beside Swan Lake. Samuel was a carpenter by trade. He enlisted on November 13, 1915. He and his brother Godfrey (see above) left Victoria with the 88th Battalion in 1916 and transferred to the 3rd Canadian Pioneers. In 1917, after serving seven months with the 3rd Canadian Pioneers, he was wounded in action at Vimy. He received his discharge the following August. Samuel was killed in a motorcycle accident in Saanich on October 8, 1925 at the age of 31 and is buried at Royal Oak Burial Park. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll and the 88th Battalion Nominal Roll. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives. Sources: Saanich Archives Vertical Files; The Daily Colonist (Wed 25 Apr 1917, p.5), The Daily Colonist (Fri 11 Oct 1918, p.5), The Daily Colonist 7 Oct 1925.  Attestation Papers | Photo

Girling, Stanley (Gunner)

Service Number: 78035. Stanley Girling was born on November 1, 1891 in Woolwich, England along with his twin brother, Godfrey (see above). He immigrated to Saanich in about 1910 with his parents, George Godfrey Girling and Ellen Elizabeth Mills, and seven of his siblings. The family home and farm was located at 781 Ralph Street beside Swan Lake. Stanley and his brother Leonard (see above) joined the 5th Regiment, Canadian Garrison Artillery in 1914 and left Victoria with a draft of munition workers in 1915. In 1917, Stanley and Leonard were working in Royal Arsenal, Woolwich. His Attestation Papers show his enlistment with the 47th at Seaford, Sussex in August 1917. He then joined the 72nd Seaforth Highlanders in France. In October 1918, Stanley was reported seriously ill and wounded in the jaw and left shoulder. He spent time in Orpington Hospital, Kent. After Stanley was wounded in the field, his brother Leonard twice gave his blood for transfusion to Stanley to save his life.  As a result of this action, Leonard died. Stanley returned to Saanich and married Beatrice Hadfield on March 25, 1920, and they later had two daughters. Stanley was an inventor and machinist. Sometime after the war, he designed a motorcycle coupe car for himself which allowed him to drive with his one serviceable hand. He worked for BC Motor Transportation Co. in the latter part of his life. At some point Stanley and his family moved to Vancouver, where they lived at 4283 West 12th Avenue. He died in Vancouver on September 11, 1950 at the age of 57. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives. Sources: Saanich Archives Vertical Files; The Daily Colonist (Wed 25 Apr 1917, p.5), The Daily Colonist (Sun 4 Nov 1917, p.5), The Daily Colonist (Fri 11 Oct 1918, p.5).  Attestation Papers | Photo

Goffin Pte Victor

Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student.

Goldie, William Newlands Jr. (Private)

Killed in Action 12 June 1917. Service Number: 181181. William Newlands Goldie Jr. is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. In September 2016, a group led by Gavin Cooper visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including the Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery in France. Photograph courtesy of Gavin Cooper.  Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves Commission | Canadian Virtual War Memorial | Grave

Goldie Pte W. Sr.

Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student.

Grainger Pte Bert.

Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student.

Grainger, Herbert (Private)                                                             

Killed in Action May 19, 1915. Service Number: 77448. Herbert Grainger was born on October 17, 1891 in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. He was a carpenter living at Keating at the time of his enlistment on November 9, 1914. Herbert Grainger is buried in Guards Cemetery, Windy Corner, Cuinchy (France). He is commemorated on the Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial and the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: J. Clements. In September 2015, a group visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including Guards Cemetery. Photographs courtesy of Gavin Cooper.  Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves | Guards Cemetery| Grave | Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial                                                               

Grainger Pte Thomas

Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student.

Grant Pte John M.

Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student.

Green, Arthur Thomas (Sergeant Major)

Arthur Thomas Green was born on August 28, 1868 in Lewes, Sussex, England.  He served in both the South African War and the First World War.  After the war, he lived at 817 Vine Street in the Maywood area with his wife, Beatrice.  He was a resident of the Greater Victoria area for 47 years, with his last address before his death being 3601 Calumet Avenue.  He died on November 11, 1957 at the age of 89, leaving four sons, four daughters, 16 grandchildren, 16 great-grandchildren, and two sisters. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: V. Green. Sources: Obituary from the Victoria Daily Times, November 12, 1957; War Service Gratuity forms.

Green, Arthur Victor (Private)

Arthur Victor Green (known in the Green family as Uncle Vic) served in World War I as a stretcher bearer and ambulance driver.  He was born in 1897 and died in 1989 at aged 92. Information submitted by: V. Green. Photo caption: Arthur Victor Green with his wife, Gertie, in 1970 on the occasion of their 50th Wedding Anniversary (courtesy V. Green). Photo | Information from The Canadian Letters & Images Project

Green, Athol Reginald (Gunner)

Service Number: 332862. Athol Reginald Green joined the Canadian Army – Artillery – 18 pounders. He served in all the battles on the Western Front. He was not wounded and after the war he moved to Seattle and was a very successful executive with the Simpson Logging Company. There were nine Green brothers and seven of them served in the Australian, English, and Canadian Armies. They were gassed and wounded but all survived. Information submitted in memory of our uncles by Helen Carr (nee Green), Fred and John Green.  Attestation Papers

Green, Frederick Stanley

Service Number: 1250591. Frederick Stanley Green joined the Canadian Army – Artillery 18 pounders (a horse drawn fast firing gun regiment). He fought in all the major battles of the Western Front. He was wounded in the back by shrapnel at Passchendaele. After the war he lived with his wife Naomi on Santa Clara Avenue in Saanich, and was the assessor for Saanich until he retired August 31, 1957. There were nine Green brothers and seven of them served in the Australian, English, and Canadian Armies. They were gassed and wounded but all survived. Information submitted in memory of our uncles by Helen Carr (nee Green), Fred and John Green.  Attestation Papers

Green, Gerald

Took flight training lessons in the Royal Flying Corp in eastern Canada. He unfortunately crashed during his training without wounding himself. The war was nearly over, so he did not go overseas. He was a wonderful speaker and was in great demand. He was also the top salesman for Malkins products (jams and Jellies etc.) for Vancouver Island. There were nine Green brothers and seven of them served in the Australian, English, and Canadian Armies. They were gassed and wounded but all survived. Information submitted in memory of our uncles by Helen Carr (nee Green), Fred and John Green.

Green, Harold Hudson

Service Number: 525263. Harold Hudson Green joined the Canadian Army – 72nd Seaforth Highlanders – formed largely in Vancouver. He started as a stretcher bearer and served in all the battles on the Western Front. After watching all the horrific casualties his mates were suffering, he became a machine gunner standing out in the open and trying to shoot down German planes that were bombing their lines. Luckily, he was not hit, but he suffered from Shell Shock (now known as Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome) for several years. He eventually recovered. Harold was chosen to represent his regiment in the Triumphal March in London. After the war, he lived with Sister Kate on Santa Clara Avenue and farmed. There is a street called Harold Green Close in that area. There were nine Green brothers and seven of them served in the Australian, English, and Canadian Armies. They were gassed and wounded but all survived. Information submitted in memory of our uncles by Helen Carr (nee Green), Fred and John Green.  Attestation Papers

Green Pte J. Thomas

Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student.

Green, James Arthur (Private)

Service Number: 522877. James Arthur Green, who went by his middle name, was born on April 17, 1896 in Durham, England. On his Attestation Papers, signed on July 21, 1915, he listed his mother Mary Ann Green of (866) Brett Avenue in Saanich as his next-of-kin. His occupation was plasterer. Arthur had previously served with the 88th Regiment Victoria Fusiliers. He was invalided back to Canada in 1917 and discharged on July 31, 1918. He married Dora Waters on December 18, 1918 in Nelson, B.C. Arthur Green died in 1953 and is buried at Royal Oak Burial Park. At the time of his death, his permanent address was 824 Vernon Avenue in Saanich. James Arthur Green is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: J. Clements.  Attestation Papers | Death Card 

Green Pte Joseph

Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student.

Green, Pte Joseph A

Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student.

Green Sig Cpl Percy A

Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student.

Green Driver W.H.

Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student.

Green, Walter Thomas (Private)

Killed in Action November 10, 1917. Service Number: 430827. Walter Thomas Green is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial and the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. In September 2015, a group visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial. Photographs courtesy of Gavin Cooper. Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves | Name on Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial | Grave

Greene, Wilfred A.

Wilfred Greene was one of the soldiers who took advantage of the Saanich Soldiers Housing Scheme. He lived at 3390 Maplewood Road. His home was part of the second phase of the program (5 houses), headed by architect Ralph Berrill. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives.

Greenshaw, Arthur Henry (Private)

Killed in Action 9 September 1918. Service Number: 887614. Arthur Henry Greenshaw was born on August 1, 1897 in Shoal Lake Manitoba to Edward Ernest and Edith Emily Greenshaw. He enlisted in Lloydminster on December 3, 1915 at the age of 18. On his Attestation Papers, he listed his father, living in the Lake Hill Post Office area (Saanich), as his next of kin. Arthur's occupation at the time was farmer. Private Arthur Henry Greenshaw was serving with the 28th Battalion when he was Killed in Action on September 9, 1918. His brother, Private Charlie Greenshaw of the 54th Battalion (see below), had been killed only a few days earlier on September 2, 1918. Their father Edward Ernest Greenshaw died in Vancouver in 1920, leaving behind their mother and sisters. Information submitted by: J. Clements.  Attestation Papers | Canadian Virtual War Memorial | Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Greenshaw, Charlie (Private)

Charlie Greenshaw is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student.

Greig Pte Charles

Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student.

Griffin Bandsman A.G.

Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student.

Griffin Bandsman A.N.

Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student.

Griffin Driver O.R

Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student.

Hadden [Haddon], Thomas Robertson (Driver)

Service Number: 77901. Thomas Robertson Haddon was born on June 5, 1877 in Birmingham, Warwickshire, England to Thomas Haddon and Annie Robertson. He married Matilda Neilsen in Golden, BC on January 18, 1902. At the time of enlistment, Thomas and his family lived at 132 Regina Avenue in Saanich. Thomas served in the 16th Battalion for the entire war and returned home without injury. He died on October 3, 1951 in Powell River, BC and is buried in the Powell River Cemetery. Thomas Robertson Haddon [spelled "Hadden"] is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: S. Clifford.  Attestation Papers | Daily Colonist 29 April 1917 (p.19)

Hadfield, William (Private)

Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student. Photo

Hall, Thomas W. (Corporal)

Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student. Photo

Hall Pte W.G.

Hallam, James (Sapper)

Research in progress by: S. Kilian.

Hamilton Pte R. Wilkin

Hammill Sgt H.S.

Research in progress by: L. Kent.

Hart Pte G.B.

Hartley, Gordon Charles

Service Number: 524601. Information submitted by: J. Clements.  Attestation Papers | Veterans Death CardDeath Certificate

Harvey Pte Frank

Head Cpl W.G.

Heal, Dudley Vernon

Service Number: 2023702. Dudley Vernon Heal, son of Frederick George and Annie Margaret (nee Anderson) Heal, was born in the Lake District of Saanich on June 25, 1895. He died in Prince Rupert on December 21, 1964 at age 68. Wife: Edith (nee Ready) Heal. Information submitted by: Julie Clements.  Attestation Papers

Heal Pte Earl C.

Heal Lce Cpl F. George

Heal, Harold Victor Gordon

Service Number: 2023703. Harold Victor Gordon Heal, son of Frederick George and Annie Margaret (nee Anderson) Heal, was born in the Lake District of Saanich on April 17, 1897. He married Hazel Margaret Young in Telkwa on January 19, 1921. Information submitted by: Julie Clements.  Attestation Papers

Hector Cpl J.

Hector Pte W.

Hedley, Norman (Private)

Service Number: 524695. Norman Hedley, son of A. A. and Jennie Hedley, was born in Saanich on July 20, 1897.  He served with the 13th Field Ambulance and died on June 7, 1920 at age 22. He is buried at Ross Bay Cemetery in Victoria, BC. Information submitted by: Julie Clements.  Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves Commission | Canadian Virtual War Memorial | Ross Bay Cemetery

Henderson Gunner C.B. Henry

Hibbert Driver Geo.

Hick Pte C.G.

Hick Pte E.G.

Hickling Pte Reg. A.

Hill Pte J.

Hill Bugler T.T.

Hill Pte W.

Hilliard, Eldon (Sergeant)

Killed in Action 27 July 1916. Service Number: 107312. Eldon Hilliard is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. In June 2016, Military Researcher Steve Clifford visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including the Railway Dugout Burial Ground in Belgium. Photographs courtesy of Steve Clifford.  Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves Commission | Canadian Virtual War MemorialRailway Dugout Burial Ground | Grave

Hitchin Pte Henry

Hobbs Lce Cpl T.C.

Hobson Lce Cpl F. Paul

Hodgkinson Sgt S.

Hodgson Pte W.

Hodson Sapper Reg.

Holyoake Pte C.H.

Research in progress by: L. Kent.

Hopkins, Freeman

Freeman Hopkins was one of the soldiers who took advantage of the Saanich Soldiers Housing Scheme. He lived at 3347 Oak Street. His home was part of the second phase of the program (5 houses), headed by architect Ralph Berrill. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives.

Houghton Pte J.

Howe, Alfred (Lance Corporal)

Killed in Action 10 April 1917. Service Number: 430671. Alfred Wilson Howe was born on December 24, 1895 in Liverpool, England to John and Mary Jane Howe. At the time of enlistment, he lived with his parents at 3142 Irma Street. He and his father were both bricklayers at Luney Brothers construction company. Alfred enlisted on March 18, 1915 at the age of 19, the same day as his brother Joseph. He and his brother left Victoria with the 48th Battalion. After he arrived in England, Alfred was transferred to the 27th Battalion. During this time, his parents moved to Ducks, B.C. (Kamloops). Both brothers were injured in 1916 and spent some time at a military hospital in Halifax, Yorkshire before returning to the front. Alfred was killed in action on April 10, 1917 in an attack near Vimy Ridge. He is buried at the Vimy Memorial, Pas de Calais, France. He is commemorated by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (Lance Corporal), at the Vimy Memorial, and on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll (Private). Information submitted by: Saanich Archives and members of the Howe family. In September 2015, a group visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including the Vimy Memorial. Photographs courtesy of Gavin Cooper.  Attestation Papers  | Commonwealth War Graves Commission | Canadian Cemetery No. 2 at Vimy | Canadian Grave Marker | Daily Colonist 30 Jul 1916, p.11 | Daily Colonist 19 May 1917, p.7 | Photo 1 [PDF - 1.6 MB] | Photo 2 [PDF - 1.8 MB]

Howe, Joseph (Private)

Service Number: 430606. Joseph Howe, known as Joe, was born on March 6, 1898 in Liverpool, England to John and Mary Jane Howe. At the time of enlistment, he likely lived with his parents at 3142 Irma Street in Saanich. On his attestation papers, he lists his trade or calling as “Farmer”. Joseph enlisted on March 18, 1915 at the age of 17, the same day as his brother Alfred. It appears that Joseph lied about his age, listing his birthdate as March 6, 1895. He and his brother left Victoria with the 48th Battalion. During this time, his parents moved to Ducks, B.C. (Kamloops). Both brothers were injured in 1916 and spent some time at a military hospital in Halifax, Yorkshire before returning to the front. Joseph survived the war and went on to become a Police Officer. He married Clara Mills Tribe in 1931 in Vancouver. He died in Salmon Arm in 1974 at the age of 76. He is commemorated on the Saanich Honour Roll. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives and Tivola Howe, daughter of Joseph Howe.  Attestation Papers | Daily Colonist 30 Jul 1916, p.11 | Photo 1 [PDF - 1.6 MB] | Photo 2 [PDF - 1.8 MB] | Photo 3 [PDF - 3.2 MB]

Howe, Robert

Service Number: 478923. Brother of Alfred and Joseph Howe (see above). Robert Howe was born on April 27, 1900 (although his Attestation Papers list his birth year as 1897) in New Ferry, Cheshire, England to Mary Jane and John Howe of Snowdrop Avenue, Garden City Post Office, Saanich. Robert enlisted as a Private with the Royal Canadian Regiment on March 1, 1916, after his brothers, and was only 15 years old when he went overseas that year. He landed at Caesars Camp, Folkestone, England on July 6, 1916 and in France on August 8, 1916. Robert was invalided to Canada on September 24, 1917 for medical treatment; records show that he had respiratory problems. He returned to British Columbia and for many years was the Indian Agent in Vanderhoof. Information submitted by: John Howe, son; and Tivola Howe, niece of Robert Howe.  Attestation Papers | Photo [PDF - 1.6 MB]

Hughes, Hugh William (Private)

Died of wounds at Etaples, France on September 17, 1917. Service Number: 826936. Hugh William Hughes, the fourth son of Mary Anne & John James Hughes, was born near London, England on 27 August 1880. When he enlisted for service he was a farmer living on West Saanich Road. Private Hughes served with the 143rd Battalion, B.C. Bantams, as a stretcher bearer and was later transferred to the 47th Battalion. He was married to Daisy Mae Hughes and had three young children at the time of his death. He is commemorated at St Luke's Church cemetery in Saanich on the headstone of his mother, Mary Anne Hughes. Daily Colonist 1917, page 6 - PTE HUGHES KILLED; HAS YOUNG FAMILY - Pte. H. W. Hughes who went overseas with the 143rd Battalion, B.C. Bantams, as a stretcher bearer and was transferred to the 47th Battalion, died of wounds on Tuesday last, according to word received yesterday by his brother Lieut. P. H. Hughes, of the Corps of School Cadet Instructors. Pte. Hughes leaves a wife and three little children, the youngest of which, a boy, was born only two months ago. They live at 2295 Cranmore Road.  Before the war the family was farming at Keating and Heals in Saanich. Besides Lieut. Hughes, there are four other brothers, special Constable J. W. Hughes, on duty in London, Mr. T. L. Hughes, in the estates office, London; Sergt. H. E. Hughes, with the C.A.M.C. in France, and Pte. A. O. Hughes, with the C.A.M.C., on his way to France. Pte. Hughes was born 37 years ago at Old Southgate, near London. The family came out here from England during the last eight years. Information submitted by: B.Ellison. In September 2015, a group visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including the grave of Hugh William Hughes at Etaples Military Cemetery. Photographs courtesy of Gavin Cooper.  Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves Commission | Etaples Military Cemetery | Grave

Hughes Pte John

Hull, Albert (Private)

The Hull family farm was located near Granville and Hastings in the Strawberry Vale area of Saanich. Albert Hull acquired the land through Soldiers Land Settlement. "The Gillie farm was leased for many years to Mr. Albert Hull and his son Aubrey. The Hulls grew large crops of potatoes on the flats, using a fine blend of fertilizers that included the results of their pig farm on Granville Avenue. The whole neighbourhood knew when the preparation for planting had begun." (Daily Colonist, 12 Jan 1975). Also see WWII ration book belonging to Albert Hull (Saanich Archives 2010-001). Albert Hull is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives.

Humphrey, Tom (Sergeant)

Service Number: 430474. Information submitted by: J. Clements.  Attestation Papers

Irving Pte Robert

Jackson Cpl H.

Jackson Pte Wm.

John, Frederick Clifford (Private)                                                  

Killed in Action September 25, 1915. Service Number: 77042. Frederick Clifford John is buried at Berks Cemetery Extension, Belgium. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. In September 2015, a group visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including Berks Cemetery Extension. Photographs courtesy of Gavin Cooper.  Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves | Berks Cemetery Extension 1 | Berks Cemetery Extension 2 | Grave | Colonist, Oct 14 1915, p. 5

Johnson Pte Alf. A.

Johnson Pte A.E.

Johnson Pte W.

Johnston, D.W. (Sapper)

Photo

Johnston, James Hamilton (Gunner)

Service Number: 2044043. James Hamilton Johnston was born in Victoria on August 2, 1877 to Philip and Agnes Johnston. He married Georgina Carrier (sister of Bernard and Reginald Carrier, above) on September 8, 1909 at Christ Church Cathedral in Victoria. At the time of his enlistment on January 4, 1917, James was living at "Keatings Cross Rd, RMD No. 1, Royal Oak, BC". His occupation was listed as farmer. In the 1921 census, James, wife Georgina, and daughters Margaret and Katherine were still living at Keating. James Hamilton Johnston died on January 1, 1923 at Keating at the age of 45. H.P. Thorpe, Secretary of the Canadian Legion Victoria Post. No. 1, wrote a letter to the Saanich Municipal Clerk on March 30, 1926 submitting J.H. Johnston's name for inclusion on the municipality’s Honour Roll. The original letter is preserved at Saanich Archives. Information submitted by: M. Green and Saanich Archives. Attestation Papers | Photo and letter to daughter Margaret [PDF - 668 KB] | Honour Roll Nomination Letter [PDF - 5.1 MB]

Johnston Sgt Mjr W.J.

Jones, Albert

Albert Jones was one of the soldiers who took advantage of the Saanich Soldiers Housing Scheme. He lived at 3417 Quadra Street. His home was part of the first phase of the program (14 houses), headed by architect Major Karl Branwhite Spurgin. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives.

Jones Pte Arthur

Jones, Fred (Private)

Service Number: 258885. Fred Jones was born in Sheffield England on July 12 1895. He served in the 211th Battalion in the Canadian Infantry. He enlisted at the age of 21 in the year 1916. He survived the war, but when and how he died is unknown. He never married and he was a member of the Church of England. Fred Jones is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: Spectrum Community School Student, Library Science course (Grade 10 & 11).  Attestation Papers

Jones Lce Cpl J.W.

Jones, John Wylie

Killed in Action.

Joplin, Albert Edward

Albert Edward Joplin was one of the soldiers who took advantage of the Saanich Soldiers Housing Scheme. He lived at 986 Tattersall (then called Blenkinsop Road). His home was part of the first phase of the program (14 houses), headed by architect Major Karl Branwhite Spurgin. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives.

Kelling Pioneer Geo. L.

Kellow, Robert (Private)

Killed in Action 30 October 1917. Service Number: 826942. Robert Thomas Mansell Kellow was born on September 27, 1882 in Delabole, Cornwall, England to James Kellow and Harriet Louisa Mansell. After the death of his parents, Robert is recorded on the 1901 English and Wales census as a “nephew” and working as a carpenter’s apprentice in London. Robert immigrated to Canada in 1904 aboard the Sarmatian and made his way to Victoria, BC where he worked as a carpenter before enlisting on September 7, 1916 at the age of 34. On his attestation papers Robert is described as single, 5’6, 134 pounds of dark complexion, black hair and blue eyes. His brother Albert is listed as his next of kin at Victoria Ave (later renamed Vernon Ave in 1923), Saanich Road, Victoria, BC. Robert was initially assigned to the 143rd Battalion Canadian Expeditionary Force (BC Bantams) with barracks at Beacon Hill Park and a training camp in Sidney BC. The BC Bantams were Canada’s first Bantam battalion – a battalion created to enlist men that could not meet the physical requirements for regular service. On February 1917 the 143rd Battalion shipped over to Vancouver, BC aboard the Princess Mary and the Princess Victoria, took a train to Halifax and then set sail to England aboard the S.S. Southland. Robert arrived in Liverpool, England on February 27, 1917. On March 17, 1917 Robert was transferred into the 24th Reserve Battalion and on May 12, 1917 he was transferred into the 2nd Regiment Canadian Mounted Rifles. The 2nd CMR fought as part of the 8th Canadian Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division in France and Flanders. Robert was reported wounded and missing on October 30, 1917 following an attack north of Passchendaele. When no further information was relayed, he was officially presumed to have died on or since October 30, 1917. He is remembered at the Menin Gate (Ypres) memorial plot panel 30 & 32, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. Robert Kellow is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: K. Obreza. In June 2016, Military Researcher Steve Clifford visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including the Menin Gate Memorial in Belgium. Photographs courtesy of Steve Clifford.  Attestation Papers | Canadian Virtual War Memorial | Commonwealth War Graves Commission | Menin Gate Memorial | Name on Menin Gate Memorial | C.E.F. Death Certificate

King Pioneer F.C.

Kirchin Pte C.H.

Kirk, Jock (Jack) (Private)

Service Number: 28754. Jock (Jack) Kirk was born on August 5, 1894 in Kirkpatrick, Dumfries, Scotland. On March 28, 1914 he enlisted in the 50th Regiment (Gordon Highlanders), Canadian Scottish Regiment, at Victoria. He resided with his brother and sister-in-law, Robert and Jean Kirk, at 3317 Oak Street in Saanich. Jack moved to Port Angeles following the war as he was unable to find work in Victoria. He married and lived in Port Angeles until his death in 1957. Jack Kirk is buried in Ocean View cemetery in Port Angeles. His uniform was returned to Victoria in 1986, and in 1987 the family donated it to the Regimental Museum at the Bay Street Armoury. The uniform included a single stripe of material attached to his uniform jacket sleeve which signified that Jack had been wounded in battle.  Information submitted by: L. Neil.  Attestation Papers | Reference Material [PDF - 9.4 MB]

Kirswell Pte T.

Lamberth Pte R.

Landy, Thomas (Private)

Killed in Action 14 June 1916. Service Number: 154122. In June 2016, Military Researcher Steve Clifford visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery in Belgium. Photographs courtesy of Steve Clifford.  Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves Commission | Canadian Virtual War Memorial | Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery | Grave

Lang Pte L.

Large Pte W.R.

Lawrence Sig Sgt E.J.

Lawrence Pte R.E.

Leigh A.

Research in progress by: Spectrum Community School Student.

Letts Pte A.F.

Leyland, Joseph Ernest

Ernest Joseph Leyland, known as Ernie, served with the Loyal North Lancashire Infantry, 2nd Battalion in WWI. He left BC in the fall of 1914 to rejoin his regiment -- he had served with them previously from 1902 to 1906. Ernest was injured in France in 1915, was in hospital in Anwick England for 9 months, and returned to Canada in July 1916. He had a limp from his leg injury for the remainder of his life. He lived at various addresses in Saanich following the war, including Darwin Avenue (1948), Glanford Avenue, and finally at 1960 Argyle Street. Ernest Joseph Leyland died in 1977 at the age of 91. Information submitted by: Wendy Leyland, granddaughter.  Photos [PDF - 203 KB]

Liptrot Pte J.

J. Liptrot was one of the soldiers who took advantage of the Saanich Soldiers Housing Scheme. He lived at 668 Ralph Street at Douglas. His home was part of the first phase of the program (14 houses), headed by architect Major Karl Branwhite Spurgin. J. Liptrot is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives.

Liptrot, Walter (Private)

Service Number: 463118. Walter Liptrot was born in Preston, Lancashire, England on July 28, 1894 to parents Lot Liptrot and Eliza (Ashcroft) Liptrot. On the 1901 England and Wales Census Walter’s father is employed as a tailor and Walter is the youngest of his seven siblings. In May of 1912 Walter immigrated to Canada aboard the ship Canada and took up residence with his sister Mary Alice Whittle at 658 Ralph Street in the Swan Lake area of Saanich.  Walter found work at Thorpe and Company, a bottle manufacturer located at 629 David Street off Gorge Road and worked there with his brother John. Walter joined the 5th Victoria Regiment in October 1914 and was transferred to the 62nd Overseas Battalion CEF in July 1915. Walter and the 62nd 1st Reinforcing Draft sailed to England aboard the S.S. Scandinavian from Montreal, Quebec on October 1, 1915. Walter was then transferred to the 48th Battalion and went to France in March 1916. In May of 1916 he was suffering from “bad feet” and found that he could walk no more than 4 miles without pain. In July 1916 at Ypres, Walter suffered a bullet wound in his right shoulder and spent 6 weeks in hospital in France. At this time the poor condition of his feet was documented on his Medical Case Sheet as flat feet with “complete obliteration of both arches.” Following his surgery for the gunshot wound, Walter was sent to England as temporarily medically unfit. In February 1917 Walter was sent back to France with the 3rd Canadian Labourers and carried on despite the poor condition of his feet. On August 24, 1917 he suffered a concussion to the brain and spent 3 months recovering in hospital. A full medical history was taken on November 6, 1917 and although he was of a “nervous” temperament no ill effects were found from the concussion. In December 1917 The Medical Board determined that his flat feet were a permanent disability and he was medically unfit to continue service. His official discharge paper was signed on February 4, 1919 in Vancouver BC. Walter suffered from heart disease, Parkinson’s disease, manic depressive disorder and psychosis for several years before his death from pneumonia on July 29, 1971 at Shaughnessy Hospital in Vancouver BC. He never married and his sister in-law Frances Liptrot signed his death certificate. He is buried at Mt. View Cemetery, Vancouver BC. Walter Liptrot is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: K. Obreza.  Attestation Papers | Daily Colonist Feb 2, 1919, p. 11

Little, Robert Stark (Sergeant)

Killed in Action 27 September 1918. Service Number: 102244. Robert Stark Little was born 17 September 1884 in Kirkcaldy, Scotland.  The youngest child of Lawrence Stark and Janet Andrew Little, Robert immigrated to Canada with his family in 1906 and settled in Winnipeg where Robert worked as a machinist at the iron works.  The family moved to Saanich in 1911 and built a house on Hyacinth Avenue in the Garden City area.  Robert was employed at the Victoria Machinery Depot when he enlisted with the 67th Battalion, Western Scots in September 1915.  In England he was transferred to the 102nd Battalion.  He was wounded in action in 1917 and returned to the Front where he was killed in action on 27 September 1918, ten days after his 34th birthday.  Robert Stark Little is buried at Bourlon Wood Cemetery in France. He is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: S. Nicholson.  In September 2016, a group led by Gavin Cooper visited cemeteries overseas as part of the Saanich Remembers Project, including the Bourlon Wood Cemetery in France. Photograph courtesy of Gavin Cooper. Attestation Papers | Commonwealth War Graves Commission | Portraits [PDF - 4.6 MB] | Boot Lace Puller [PDF - 4.6 MB] | Burial Card [PDF - 2.9 MB] | Medals [PDF - 5.4 MB] | Photo | Grave

Lohr, Alfred Magnus

Killed in Action.

Lowry (Lowery), R.H.

R.H. Lowry (Lowery) was one of the soldiers who took advantage of the Saanich Soldiers Housing Scheme. He lived at 3271 Wascana Street. His home was part of the first phase of the program (14 houses), headed by architect Major Karl Branwhite Spurgin. Information submitted by: Saanich Archives.

Luff, Frank (Private)

Service Number: 180965. Frank Luff was born on March 6, 1895 (or 6) to Frank (Sr.) Luff and Amelia Duckett in Mark, Somerset, England. On the 1901 England and Wales Census Frank’s father is listed as a farmer and a milk dealer without his wife Amelia, who died in 1897 shortly after giving birth to her twelfth child. Frank’s father left England in 1907 and immigrated to Canada, leaving the dairy farm in the hands of his children, and set up a strawberry farm in Elk Lake, Saanich. A few years later Frank (Jr.) at the age of 18 and his older sister Annie immigrated to Canada and departed London on April 16, 1913 aboard the steamship the Ionian. Frank worked as a farmer before he enlisted on January 15, 1916 in Victoria, BC at the age of 20. Frank listed his father as his next of kin at Elk Lake P.O. Royal Oak BC. On his Attestation Papers Frank is described as 5’7" with fair hair, blue eyes and a ruddy complexion. He was assigned to the 88th Battalion Victoria Fusiliers C.E.F., a local militia unit established in Victoria in 1912. Frank and the 88th Battalion set sail for England from Halifax, NS aboard the S.S. Olympic on June 1916. On his service record Frank is listed as a prisoner of war. After the war Frank returned to Victoria and worked as a mechanic. He married Edith Sarah Bishop on August 4, 1923 at their home at 682 Alpha Street. They had a daughter, Beverly Doreen, who trained to be a nurse at Saint Joseph’s Hospital. For 25 years Frank worked as a letter carrier and had several residences in Saanich. The British Columbia City Directories records his residence as 2712 Belmont Ave in the 1930’s which is in the Oaklands area of Victoria. From 1940 to 1955, Frank, Edith and daughter Beverly lived at 1898 Forrester Ave in the “Dean Heights” area of Saanich East. Private Frank Luff died at the Veterans’ Hospital in Victoria on June 23, 1972. He is buried at Royal Oak Burial Park and is commemorated on the Saanich WWI Honour Roll. Information submitted by: Kelly Obreza.  Attestation Papers